Teaching math or science in developing world

In summary, if you are considering teaching in a developing world, please be sure about your motives and be prepared for all of the possible challenges.
  • #1
pantheid
53
0
Hi, I will be graduating soon and its time to start thinking about what I want to do with my life. I will have a bachelors degree in "math & physics" and a masters degree in physics by June 2016. I've been considering, more and more strongly, to go to the developing world (Africa or the Middle East, in my mind) to teach math or science. I've been doing some research on it but it goes slowly, do you guys know of any programs that send people like me to teach abroad?
 
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  • #3
If you are considering teaching in "the developing world" you should be sure about your motives before you go.

If you are thinking about it because "it's what good people do" or some such thing, I would say forget it. Doing something because it's "the right thing to do" is not a recipe for happiness. Don't do it out of altruism.

That is not to say that helping people who can really use help is bad. But do it because you will feel good about yourself and find it personally rewarding.

If you really think it will be rewarding, then go have a careful look and see if it really might be for you. For example, scope out what your living conditions might be. Hot and cold running malaria? Fresh water on alternate Tuesdays? Tarantulas for house pets? Is there an internet connection in the same weather zone? Figure out what the minimum commitment time might be. Figure out what language barriers there might be. Figure out what "political" issues there might be. Is the place you are considering equipped with a civil war? Do the locals have a hate-on for persons who look like (act like, eat like, believe like) you?

If you can accept all of that (shopping will be unlikely) and still look forward to it, then go for it.
 

Related to Teaching math or science in developing world

1. What are the challenges of teaching math and science in the developing world?

The main challenges of teaching math and science in the developing world include lack of resources and infrastructure, limited access to quality education, language barriers, and cultural differences. Additionally, many developing countries face issues such as poverty, political instability, and high teacher turnover rates, making it difficult to establish a consistent and effective education system.

2. How can technology be used to improve math and science education in the developing world?

Technology can play a crucial role in improving math and science education in the developing world. Online resources and educational apps can provide access to quality materials and interactive learning experiences, even in areas with limited resources. Additionally, technology can help bridge language barriers and make learning more engaging and accessible for students.

3. What strategies can be used to make math and science education more culturally relevant in the developing world?

One strategy is to incorporate local examples and real-life applications of math and science concepts into the curriculum. This can help students see the relevance of these subjects in their daily lives and make learning more meaningful. Another strategy is to involve the community and local experts in the teaching process, incorporating their knowledge and experiences into the lessons.

4. How can we attract and retain qualified teachers in the developing world?

To attract and retain qualified teachers in the developing world, it is important to provide competitive salaries and benefits, as well as opportunities for professional development and career advancement. Additionally, creating a supportive and inclusive work environment can help teachers feel valued and motivated to stay in their positions.

5. What are some successful examples of improving math and science education in the developing world?

There have been several successful initiatives to improve math and science education in the developing world. For example, the One Laptop per Child program has provided low-cost laptops to students in developing countries, increasing access to educational resources. Other successful programs focus on teacher training and support, community involvement, and incorporating technology into the curriculum. Additionally, partnerships between governments, NGOs, and private organizations have also shown promising results in improving math and science education in the developing world.

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