Terminology, pressure of gas in fluid (quick question)

In summary, the authors found that when the CO2 pressure is increased from 1 to 11 bar, the surface tension of water changes from 72 mN m−1 to 57 mN m−1.
  • #1
rwooduk
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Would it be correct to say the following...

CO2 for example can change the surface tension of water from 72 mN m−1 to 57 mN m−1 as its pressure changes from 1 to 11 bar.

I'm used to dealing with concentrations, in fact I would like to change bar to volume percent if anyone has a free moment and might suggest a method and the values I would need.

Thanks for any help with this.
 
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  • #2
Check the context (reference?): it seems to me they may refer to the CO2 pressure above the water.
 
  • #3
BvU said:
Check the context (reference?): it seems to me they may refer to the CO2 pressure above the water.

Hm, here is the paper (info given about 1/4 down the abstract):

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0021979796902726

Also

A sensitive pressure transducer capable of resolving one part in a hundred thousand was connected into the pipework, and enabled accurate measurement of the absolute pressure, while a similarly accurate external barometer allowed us to record the atmospheric pressure.

It does say 1 to 11 bar absolute, would that that give any indication as to whether it's the pressure in the water or above? I assumed (which is why I wasn't sure of the context) that if a liquid is pressurised with gas then that would indicate how much is in there (partial pressure?) is that incorrect?
 
  • #4
I'm convinced it's the pressure of CO2 above the liquid. "how much is in there" isn't expressed in terms of a pressure but in molality, molarity or some similar concentration (e.g. g/100 g solvent). Check out Henry's law.
 
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  • #5
BvU said:
I'm convinced it's the pressure of CO2 above the liquid. "how much is in there" isn't expressed in terms of a pressure but in molality, molarity or some similar concentration (e.g. g/100 g solvent). Check out Henry's law.

Ok thanks very much for the help!
 

Related to Terminology, pressure of gas in fluid (quick question)

1. What is pressure of gas in fluid?

Pressure of gas in fluid refers to the amount of force that the gas molecules exert on the walls of the container in which they are contained.

2. How is pressure of gas in fluid measured?

Pressure of gas in fluid is typically measured using a device called a manometer, which measures the difference in height of a liquid column between two points in a container.

3. What factors affect the pressure of gas in fluid?

The pressure of gas in fluid is affected by temperature, volume, and the number of gas molecules present in the container. It follows the ideal gas law, which states that pressure is directly proportional to temperature and number of molecules, and inversely proportional to volume.

4. How does pressure of gas in fluid impact the behavior of gases?

Pressure of gas in fluid determines how gases behave, including their ability to expand and contract, their diffusion rate, and their solubility in liquids. It is also a key factor in determining the state of matter that a gas will exist in (i.e. solid, liquid, or gas).

5. How is pressure of gas in fluid used in real-world applications?

Pressure of gas in fluid is used in a variety of applications, including weather forecasting, gas storage and transportation, and scuba diving. It is also a key concept in many scientific fields, such as chemistry, physics, and engineering.

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