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Featured Insights The Birth of a Textbook - Comments

  1. Dec 24, 2017 #41
    Congrats, Orodruin. I'm a third year physics major, and so I will definitely order a paperback (I can't afford the hardcover as of right now).
     
  2. Dec 24, 2017 #42

    vanhees71

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    I've ordered it yesterday directly from the CRC website :-)).
     
  3. Dec 25, 2017 #43

    Math_QED

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    Congratulations! I can't imagine how time-consuming it must have been to write such a marvelous book, containing years of expertise and knowledge. I hope the hard work pays off well!
     
  4. Dec 25, 2017 #44

    Orodruin

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    How do you know it is marvelous? :wink:
    (Although I did my best, I think I will let others judge that ... :rolleyes:)
     
  5. Dec 25, 2017 #45

    Astronuc

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    I like to TOC:

    Vector analysis.
    Tensor analysis.
    Modelling physical systems using PDEs.
    Function spaces.
    Series and transform solutions.
    Green’s functions.
    Variational calculus.
    Calculus on manifolds.
    Classical mechanics.
    Electrodynamics.
    Special and general relativity.

    Reference https://www.physicsforums.com/insights/the-birth-of-a-textbook/

    I could have used such a book more than 40 years ago. Instead, I had to sit down with the university course catalog and figure out which mathematics courses I need in parallel with the physics courses I wanted to take. As far as I know, there was no coordination between the mathematics and physics departments, although I think the applied math group coordinated with physics and other sciences somewhat. The lack of coordination between physics and math frustrated me in high school, because it seemed clear that one had to be proficient in calculus to apply it in physics. I had to a lot of self-study early on.
     
  6. Dec 26, 2017 #46

    Orodruin

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    Note that this is not the actual table of contents. It was the intended contents in my first draft. Since then I removed electrodynamics and relativity and added a chapter on group theory. The actual table of contents can be found on the CRC Press homepage. However, I have attempted to use examples from relatively basic physics throughout the text.
     
  7. Dec 26, 2017 #47

    Math_QED

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    I read the insights article! Of course, I didn't read the book (yet), but let's consider it an educated guess, considering what I know from the forums ;)
     
  8. Dec 26, 2017 #48

    nomadreid

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    I note that the book was relabeled from "introductory" to "for graduate students or advanced undergraduate students". I presume that means in physics. If one is not a physicist, how much mathematical background is necessary to be able to follow the explanations?
     
  9. Dec 27, 2017 #49
    I am happy you wrote a book. I think it will be an excellent and very useful book. Congratulations!
    Does the book discuss tensor analysis, or could i read the contents?
     
  10. Dec 27, 2017 #50

    Orodruin

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    To follow everything, you would need to be proficient in multivariable calculus, linear algebra, and introductory courses in differential equations. Complex analysis will also help at some points. The text is written with a focus on the physics applications of the mathematics. Most of the physics used (that is not introduced specifically) also relies on relatively basic classical physics. Of course, the difficulty varies from chapter to chapter and the first few chapters should be rather accessible with just calculus and linear algebra.

    Yes. Tensor analysis in a Euclidean space (but in general coordinates) is included in chapter 2 and calculus on manifolds is covered in chapter 9. A list of chapters is available on the CRC Press homepage (there is a link at the bottom of the Insight).
     
  11. Jan 5, 2018 #51
  12. Jan 5, 2018 #52
    For anyone wanting a preview of the content, Amazon now has the "Look inside" feature for this book, although it is only of the Kindle version and therefore looks rather ugly.
     
  13. Jan 5, 2018 #53

    Orodruin

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    Indeed. I am pretty sure the printed version looks much better, at least my print-ready pdf does, and that this is auto-generated. Solely based on the number of equations, this is about one third of the first chapter.

    @Greg Bernhardt has seen the copies used for prizes in the photo and haiku/limerick contests and should be able to confirm. I am hoping my author copies have arrived when I get back to work after the holidays on Monday.
     
  14. Jan 5, 2018 #54
    Yeah the amazon preview is a sloppy rendering. Everything is seamless in the print version. The publisher wouldn't print the amazon render. I sent amazon a 5 star review. Hopefully they print it!
     
  15. Jan 5, 2018 #55

    mfb

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  16. Jan 5, 2018 #56

    strangerep

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    Amazon shows this as being rated by someone "especially interested in"... cat supplies. :oldlaugh:
     
  17. Jan 5, 2018 #57
    Guilty, I have a cat :biggrin:
     
  18. Jan 5, 2018 #58

    strangerep

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    Oh, don't get me wrong -- I like cats too. It just seemed quite funny mentioning that for a book about mathematical methods. :oldeyes:
     
  19. Jan 5, 2018 #59

    mfb

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    Well, with a dataset of 1 the conclusions drawn are not the best.
     
  20. Jan 6, 2018 #60

    Orodruin

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    It would have been more appropriate for a book on quantum mechanics. Or not. We won’t know until Greg reviews a QM book.
     
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