The Food Thread part 2

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dlgoff
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Main Question or Discussion Point

These jalapenos I grew this summer are really coming in handy this winter. Even the pickling liquid is extra hot. They're good in just about anything for adding a great pepper taste and a little heat.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800x600q90/690/2hpo.jpg [Broken]
 
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danago
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Looks great dlgoff! Fresh jalapeños are difficult to come by where I live, so I normally have to buy them preserved in a similar way. I did find them fresh once though, so I stuffed them with cream cheese, coated them with a light batter and then deep fried them. Spicy, cheesy, and deep fried goodness :smile:
 
turbo
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I grow my own hot peppers. Have to can them or freeze them. The season is too short.
 
Evo
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Looks great dl, I love pickled jalapenos.
 
dlgoff
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I did find them fresh once though, so I stuffed them with cream cheese, coated them with a light batter and then deep fried them. Spicy, cheesy, and deep fried goodness :smile:
Thanks for reminding me that they can be stuffed. I just finished dinner with deep fried onions, so the next time I get the fryer going, I'm going to drain/dry some of these and give it a try.

I grow my own hot peppers. Have to can them or freeze them. The season is too short.
This season was an extra good one. I think of you when growing them. Wish you well up there.
 
dlgoff
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Looks great dl, I love pickled jalapenos.
Thanks Evo. I've eaten a couple right out of the jar, seeds and all, ..... Time for beer.
 
Borek
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Burp.

This years peppers were a disaster - not only weather was not cooperating, but also we got an early frost which froze peppers. I collected them the next day to dry, but instead of nicely drying they started to mold inside (of which I become aware much later).

In the end I selected the best looking ones, put them in the blade grinder and made a small jar of fine powder. Better than nothing.
 
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lisab
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Leftovers can be wonderful, but leftarounds almost never are.
 
danago
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Today has been a very interesting day in Modena. I started the morning by visiting an old couple who produce balsamic vinegar in their house. They showed me around and then, free of charge, allowed me to sample a series of 10 different vinegars differing in age and the type of wood in which it is aged. They even spoke slowly to me (Italian isn't my mother language, so I struggle when people speak at a native pace). I ended up spending about 130 euros on two small bottles of vinegar :eek:

Then, I went to a trattoria for lunch. I was alone because my friend didn't come to Modena with me, so I was placed on a table with two old ladies from Bari who didn't speak English. It was a great opportunity to practice my Italian, but more importantly it was a great chance to sample a few Modenese dishes. I didn't select anything - the women and the waitress selected everything for me. Three plates plus a bottle of Lambrusco (and I'm talking about a full sized bottle...so much so that I drank less than half of it) for just 15 euros :big grin:

Finally, tonight, I am going to Osteria Francescana, recently voted by Restaurant magazine as the third best restaurant in the world. It won't be as cheap as lunch, thats for sure :roll eyes:
 
Evo
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Today has been a very interesting day in Modena. I started the morning by visiting an old couple who produce balsamic vinegar in their house. They showed me around and then, free of charge, allowed me to sample a series of 10 different vinegars differing in age and the type of wood in which it is aged. They even spoke slowly to me (Italian isn't my mother language, so I struggle when people speak at a native pace). I ended up spending about 130 euros on two small bottles of vinegar :eek:

Then, I went to a trattoria for lunch. I was alone because my friend didn't come to Modena with me, so I was placed on a table with two old ladies from Bari who didn't speak English. It was a great opportunity to practice my Italian, but more importantly it was a great chance to sample a few Modenese dishes. I didn't select anything - the women and the waitress selected everything for me. Three plates plus a bottle of Lambrusco (and I'm talking about a full sized bottle...so much so that I drank less than half of it) for just 15 euros :big grin:

Finally, tonight, I am going to Osteria Francescana, recently voted by Restaurant magazine as the third best restaurant in the world. It won't be as cheap as lunch, thats for sure :roll eyes:
Oh, how I envy you!
 
danago
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I had this typical Tuscan soup with cavolo nero and bread while visiting Siena:

https://scontent-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/1555304_385493181594734_736584983_n.jpg

It's probably the closest thing to healthy I've eaten on this trip so far :rolleyes: It was very tasty, and a dish that I will certainly try to recreate when I go home.
 
turbo
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I woke up famished this morning, and wished that I could wander over to the cafeteria at General Physics. When I worked there, breakfast was heavenly. SOS (creamed chipped beef on toast), hash browns, corned beef hash, bacon, ham, eggs to order, home-fried potatoes and onions, grits... anything you wanted. Most of the guys at GP were recruited out of the submarine service, and breakfasts like this were a treat; especially to the guys from the boomers, where deployments could be quite lengthy and the fresh food ran out too soon in their tour.

If you are looking for employment and you go nuts over great breakfasts, GP is located in Columbia MD. Nice people. Buttoned-down with calm demeanors and can-do attitudes.

BTW, the biscuits with sausage gravy were to die for, even though they didn't make nice flaky biscuits, but the cakey ones prevalent throughout the South. Still the sausage gravy made it worthwhile. I would have eaten that stuff on Wonder Bread.
 
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646
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I am famished now and this thread's not helping...
 
danago
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I woke up famished this morning, and wished that I could wander over to the cafeteria at General Physics. When I worked there, breakfast was heavenly. SOS (creamed chipped beef on toast), hash browns, corned beef hash, bacon, ham, eggs to order, home-fried potatoes and onions, grits... anything you wanted. Most of the guys at GP were recruited out of the submarine service, and breakfasts like this were a treat; especially to the guys from the boomers, where deployments could be quite lengthy and the fresh food ran out too soon in their tour.

If you are looking for employment and you go nuts over great breakfasts, GP is located in Columbia MD. Nice people. Buttoned-down with calm demeanors and can-do attitudes.
One thing I am missing while I am travelling is a nice big breakfast like that. The usual breakfast in Italy is a sweet pastry of some sort and a coffee. At first it sounded like a nice idea, but I could really go some poached eggs and bacon right now (well, not at this instant, but tomorrow morning when I wake up).

I am famished now and this thread's not helping...
Then I recommend that you don't look at the website below:

http://www.tastespotting.com
 
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danago
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turbo
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You could get a HUGE breakfast at Skinheads in Paducah, for a modest payout. I ordered the Skinhead Special, and the server eventually started bringing me out plate after plate. IIR, there were 5 plates in all, plus a large carafe of coffee. Where to start? The flank steak, biscuits, sausage gravy could keep you in line, but there were tons of sides that you could barely keep up with. I can eat a lot, but it might have taken 2-3 of me to keep up with a Special. Skinhead was a retired Navy cook that had an impressive reputation in Paducah. Excellent food, cheap.

IIR, the Special cost me only about $6, and I would have paid that for road food just to get the flank steak, baked beans, biscuits, and maybe a couple of sides.There was a LOT more in the Special. Sadly, it seems that skinheads is closed now. It would have been a destination for anybody traveling through northern KY. I ordered the Special, and my server kept bringing out plate after plate until I was flabbergasted. There were a couple of older ladies seated nearby that were nodding and smiling to each other. They knew.
 
Borek
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Couldn't decide whether to post it here, or in youtube classic

 
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turbo
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Wow!
 
danago
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Evo
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danago, where are you, I was enjoying your posts!
 
OmCheeto
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I had this typical Tuscan soup with cavolo nero and bread while visiting Siena:

https://scontent-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/1555304_385493181594734_736584983_n.jpg

It's probably the closest thing to healthy I've eaten on this trip so far :rolleyes: It was very tasty, and a dish that I will certainly try to recreate when I go home.
:thumbs: I think I'll add cavolo nero to my list of plants to grow. I had to ask what the "green stuff" was in the cafeteria last week. The chef said it was kale. I didn't know I liked kale until last week.

danago, where are you, I was enjoying your posts!
I agree. You should start giving him infractions if he doesn't post at least once a week. :tongue:
 

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