The most nerve wracking time of our life

  • Thread starter wolram
  • Start date
  • #26
TheMadMonk
I think being shot at any time would be nerve wracking. I certainly don't want to experience that.
I've found it to be quite exciting at times for some odd reason, probably quite a dangerous way to think but I can't really explain it.
 
  • #27
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Evo, remind me to never hang-out with you.
 
  • #28
turbo
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I think being shot at any time would be nerve wracking. I certainly don't want to experience that.
No fun!
 
  • #29
turbo
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I was shot at by a hunter from New Jersey who heard me coming through the woods and assumed that I was a deer.
 
  • #30
dlgoff
Science Advisor
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I shouldn't have looked at this thread. The electrocution thing brings back a memory I just as soon forget. Now that the images are clear in my mind now, I guess I'll share.

It had been a long work week of 12-14 hours/day doing electrical maintenance at this chemical plant; one project being installing some conduit into a large control panel/cabinet. This cabinet was about 7 feet high with access doors which were open in order to fasten the new conduit coming from above. Inside this cabinet was a maze of relays, switches, etc with live 440vac on them.

There were three of four of us doing the job; me being on a ladder, which was leaning on the front of the cabinet, directing the conduit down into its entry hole. As I was trying to get it aligned and inserted for the person below to fasten, the ladder flipped over throwing me directly into the cabinet.

They say, "things move in slow motion as your life flashes before you". It's true.

Well, one on the guys reacted very quickly putting himself in the cabinet and deflecting my trajectory. He put himself at risk as we both were within inches from the power as I crashed down.

I stood up shaking like a leaf with the first thing out of my mouth being, "Thank you for saving my life".
 
  • #31
wolram
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I shouldn't have looked at this thread. The electrocution thing brings back a memory I just as soon forget. Now that the images are clear in my mind now, I guess I'll share.

It had been a long work week of 12-14 hours/day doing electrical maintenance at this chemical plant; one project being installing some conduit into a large control panel/cabinet. This cabinet was about 7 feet high with access doors which were open in order to fasten the new conduit coming from above. Inside this cabinet was a maze of relays, switches, etc with live 440vac on them.

There were three of four of us doing the job; me being on a ladder, which was leaning on the front of the cabinet, directing the conduit down into its entry hole. As I was trying to get it aligned and inserted for the person below to fasten, the ladder flipped over throwing me directly into the cabinet.

They say, "things move in slow motion as your life flashes before you". It's true.

Well, one on the guys reacted very quickly putting himself in the cabinet and deflecting my trajectory. He put himself at risk as we both were within inches from the power as I crashed down.

I stood up shaking like a leaf with the first thing out of my mouth being, "Thank you for saving my life".
A very lucky escape, i have had a few near misses with HV electtrics
 
  • #32
Danger
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They say, "things move in slow motion as your life flashes before you". It's true.
Too true. I have experienced the time dilation effect hundreds or maybe even thousands of times, when circumstances demanded it. No "life flashes" though; it was just a matter of my mental processes accelerating to an incredible level so that everything appeared to happen in extreme slow motion. A few times, it saved my life (like when I fell head-first directly onto a spike-belt conveyor from 3 metres above, and landed on my feet beside it); most times, it allowed me (as pitcher) to catch a ball that the batter had aimed at me in hope of hurting me. There was also the occasional bar fight...
I was originally going to say the my most nerve-wracking experience was that bit about dying last year, but in retrospect that seems sort of mild.
 
  • #33
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You experienced similar fights before; or do you want them to take place with you in some very near future ? <<< this is why I believe I don't have a flight and I will never accept or be accepted to deal with anyone in charge, especially those who could see me from above :biggrin:
 
  • #34
Pythagorean
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The birth of my first child. We did it in a hospital and it was like medieval England.

Second child was in a birth center with midwives. Way smoother and more enjoyable.
 
  • #35
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My daughter was born in Japan. When my wife went to birthing lessons at the hospital, I asked to join in. However, they told me husbands were not allowed. Then when the time came I asked if I could be in the delivery room and they said no because I hadn't taken birthing lessons. When I first saw my daughter it was a few minutes after she was born. Right away I noticed a drop of blood on her forehead and it made me think she got hurt coming down the birth canal. Then it hit me that when she was born she was covered head to foot in blood and that she had been cleaned up.
 
  • #36
Pythagorean
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In the hospital birth, they stuck a thermometer right in my daughter's head. We didn't realize it actually gets stabbed into the top of the head until she was out. I'm telling you, medieval!
 

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