The phase between 2 waves describing 2 entangled particles?

Each particle has a wave associated to it according to the principle of wave-particle duality. Between two waves there is a phase difference.

What is this phase difference in the case of entangled particles? 0 degrees? 90 degrees? 180 degrees? Somewhere in between?
 

Nugatory

Mentor
12,379
4,864
It is not true that "every particle has a wave associated with it". Instead, the entire multiple-particle system has a single wave function associated with it.
 
It is not true that "every particle has a wave associated with it". Instead, the entire multiple-particle system has a single wave function associated with it.
Aren't lasers also described by a single wave of big amplitude? The phase difference for laser is considered to be 0 degrees.
 

Related Threads for: The phase between 2 waves describing 2 entangled particles?

  • Last Post
2
Replies
28
Views
2K
Replies
15
Views
1K
Replies
26
Views
6K
Replies
5
Views
498
Replies
4
Views
420
Replies
31
Views
1K
Replies
9
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
2K

Hot Threads

Top