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Tossing and turning trying to sleep

  1. Sep 16, 2006 #1

    DaveC426913

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    I think I know why I often have to turn two full 360 degree turns over the course of the half hour to one hour before I fall asleep.

    (I'm one of those furnaces who never has a problem staying warm - climbing under freezing sheets even in the deep winter, is only a problem for about 30 seconds before I start kicking them off.)

    Anyway, when I get ready to sleep, I place as much of my body on cool sheets as possible, but after 10-15 minutes, the sheets under my body warm up and I want to move positions to lie on cool sheets again.

    I am not sure if simply turning the temp down will help me, since it cools the parts I don't want cooled but doesn't cool the parts against the sheets.

    I was thinking maybe the materials in my sheets or mattress?

    Anyone have any advice on how to 'keep me sheets cool'??
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 16, 2006 #2
    Try swallowing a gyroscope.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2006
  4. Sep 16, 2006 #3
    I have the same temperature problem at my house. Over the summer, however, I was in a dorm room with it's own thermostat. I always had the temperature quite cold (it was a really comfortable cold, not too cold). It was cold enough that I could be under sheets the entire night without a problem. It really does help. Try it for one night and see what happens.

    EDIT: Does anyone know if sleeping on a water bed which is at room temperature is bad for you? If not, that could be a possible solution...
     
  5. Sep 16, 2006 #4

    Evo

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    I'm the same way, I usually only cover a small part of my body, I'm always hot. Have you checked out the "chillows" MIH posted about? http://www.asseenontv.com/prod-pages/chillow.html
     
  6. Sep 16, 2006 #5
    This sounds like a good idea at first glance, but what's he supposed to do if it runs down before he falls asleep?
     
  7. Sep 16, 2006 #6

    Evo

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    Yes, water beds that aren't heated help. (who in their right mind would heat a water bed? :grumpy: )

    I usually keep the thermostat around 65F in the winter.
     
  8. Sep 16, 2006 #7
    I know when I camp I sometimes use a hammock tent. The problem I have is that when it is cold at night I get really chilled on the side pressed against the material. Even with a down sleeping bag it doesn't help because the down is compressed.

    It sounds like my problem would be your solution. Although I'm not sure how practical a hammock bed would be... :tongue2:

    -GeoMike-
     
  9. Sep 16, 2006 #8
    Wait.... don't they have those perforated beds or something? Once again, another possibility.

    Man, I almost forgot how much better I slept over the summer. In my house, turning the temperature down this time of the year would drive the electricity costs up so much. Living in the desert has its downsides...
     
  10. Sep 16, 2006 #9

    Mk

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    Well stop making salad and steak while you're trying to sleep!
     
  11. Sep 16, 2006 #10

    Evo

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    :rofl: :biggrin:
     
  12. Sep 16, 2006 #11
    Speaking of turning 360*.... Do you ever wake up facing the opposite direction of when you went to sleep? I wish I could have a video of me doing that everytime it happens... Maybe it's the aliens!!!1111one
     
  13. Sep 16, 2006 #12

    Evo

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    You mean like your head at the foot of the bed?
     
  14. Sep 16, 2006 #13
    Maybe the bed clothing is just an excuse your using to find something other than yourself to blame for not getting to sleep. Like when your restless and irritated and the slightest thing can become the focus of your irritation.

    Try relaxation methods and clearing your head of any thoughts, breathing and stuff. I find that works best, i think the bed sheets are just a scapegoat ;)
     
  15. Sep 16, 2006 #14

    Moonbear

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    I never used to have problems with being too warm when sleeping...I was always the opposite...freezing cold and unable to warm up enough, so my cold feet kept me awake. But, now I have a tiny little generator that shares the bed with me (it's amazing how much heat a little kitten can throw off!), and while most nights I can equilibrate well enough by just kicking off one blanket, other nights (especially if I shower too close to bedtime and my body temperature starts out a bit warmer), I've had to turn the A/C cooler at night. It does help...that is, unless you share the bed with someone else who gets cold faster, in which case, they'll keep you awake by sticking their cold feet on you to warm up. :biggrin:
     
  16. Sep 16, 2006 #15

    DaveC426913

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    Yeah, I have some relaxation techniques that work amazingly**. That's not really the problem.


    **My best technique: I quell every vocalization in my head. Every one. If I can manage to not hear my own inner voices for any length of time, I'm asleep almost instantly. Unless the sheets are too warm.



    This 'keep the room cooler' thing, this is some new fangled space age technology? I sleep in the attic. There are no water-heating radiators in the attic. But even when it's only 68-72, I still have this problem. Of course, with only one tiny window on the whole floor, there's also no circulation.

    Maybe .... nah. That's just crazy...
     
  17. Sep 16, 2006 #16

    Evo

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    :surprised I have to have air circulating. I cannot sleep without a fan or a good breeze through open windows, like 40MPH winds, minimum.
     
  18. Sep 16, 2006 #17
    Well obviously he wouldn't use a wind-up, probably one with a plutonium battery (like the pacemakers). And an RF remote control to turn it off when he gets up, otherwise he'd walk around in circles all day.
     
  19. Sep 16, 2006 #18

    Moonbear

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    I never realized how drafty all the other places I've lived were until I moved into this new place that has really good windows. Yeah, even when it is plenty cold enough, I feel "stuffy" without a fan on now. But, I get cold if it's on all night. I found a fan with a remote control, and love it! I can turn it on, get comfy, fall asleep, and when my cold toes wake me up again, I just push the button on the remote to turn it off, roll over and fall back asleep. If I had to get out of bed to turn it off, that would wake me up too much and I'd never fall back asleep again. I can also adjust the speed control with the remote, so don't have to decide if I want it on high or low before tucking in for the night. :smile:
     
  20. Sep 16, 2006 #19
    Yeah, he'd need a remote. He'd never be able to lie down otherwise, because as he leaned toward the bed he'd be deflected 90 degrees. That would be a weird feeling.
     
  21. Sep 16, 2006 #20
    Of course, he might have some issues explaining to airport security why he has a nuclear-powered gyroscope inside him.
     
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