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Transition amplitudes and relation between wavefunctions

  • #1
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bb] The dipole transition amplitude for the transition (nlm) -> (n'l'm') is given by [/b]

[tex]\int \psi_{n'l'm'}^* \vec{r} \psi_{nlm} d\tau [/tex]
Is the dipole transition amplitude simply a measure of how likely a certain transiton is??

Heres another question
In converting [tex] \psi_{nlm_{l}m_{s}} = C_{n}\psi_{nljm_{j}} [/tex]
my prof said that finding the Cn would involve a rather messy calculation involving group theory... how does that come about?? How does a simple relation like j = l + s bring about something like that??

thanks for your input!
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
dextercioby
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bb] The dipole transition amplitude for the transition (nlm) -> (n'l'm') is given by [/b]

[tex]\int \psi_{n'l'm'}^* \vec{r} \psi_{nlm} d\tau [/tex]
Is the dipole transition amplitude simply a measure of how likely a certain transiton is??
It's a probability amplitude. Its square modulus gives the transition probability.

Heres another question
In converting [tex] \psi_{nlm_{l}m_{s}} = C_{n}\psi_{nljm_{j}} [/tex]
my prof said that finding the Cn would involve a rather messy calculation involving group theory... how does that come about?? How does a simple relation like j = l + s bring about something like that??
The Clebsch-Gordan coefficients that you need are a result of group theory. Angular momentum theory (including the addition of angular momenta) is a result of group theory.
 

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