Troubleshooting a Uniform Acceleration Problem: Finding Time and Height

In summary, the problem involves two stones falling from different heights and hitting the bottom at the same time. Using the equation x = ut + 1/2at^2, the time and height of the first stone can be calculated by using the known values for the second stone. The key is to set up a system of equations and solve for one variable at a time.
  • #1
Delber
19
0
I'm having trouble with this problem. I can't seem to wrap my head around it and any help would be appreciated.

Homework Statement


The problem is:
A stone falls from the top of the cliff. One second later, another falls from a ledge 45m below the top. The two stones hit the bottom simultaneously. Find the time taken for the first stone to fall and the height of the cliff.


Homework Equations


x = ut+ 1/2at^2 where x is distance and u is initial velocity



The Attempt at a Solution


I tried a couple attempts at the problem. I began by trying to make two equations equal together, but I ran into the problem that the time and distance traveled is not equal so I tried to make a system of equations. I can't figure out how to make a suitable system where I can easily solve for one variable.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Delber, I would first split the two stones into two different things. For the second stone what do you have infromation on? You have x, u and a so surely you can work out the time for the second stone? With that value for time you can calculate the time for the first stone, and again see what values you have.

With these questions usually all the infomration is given and it is a case of writing down what you are told and then seeing what forumla works with them.

Have another go :smile:
 
  • #3
Sorry, but I do not see how I have x to solve for the time of the second stone. The distance traveled of the second stone is only given as an measurement from where the first stone dropped off the cliff.
 
Last edited:

Related to Troubleshooting a Uniform Acceleration Problem: Finding Time and Height

What is uniform acceleration?

Uniform acceleration is when an object moves in a straight line with a constant acceleration, meaning its velocity changes by the same amount in each time interval.

How do you calculate uniform acceleration?

To calculate uniform acceleration, you can use the equation a = (vf - vi) / t, where a is the acceleration, vf is the final velocity, vi is the initial velocity, and t is the time interval.

What is the difference between uniform acceleration and non-uniform acceleration?

Uniform acceleration is when the velocity of an object changes by the same amount in each time interval, while non-uniform acceleration is when the velocity changes by varying amounts in each time interval.

What are some real-life examples of uniform acceleration?

Some real-life examples of uniform acceleration include a car traveling at a constant speed on a straight road, a ball rolling down a ramp, and a rocket launching into space.

How does air resistance affect uniform acceleration?

Air resistance can affect uniform acceleration by slowing down the object's velocity, causing it to accelerate less uniformly. In some cases, air resistance may also cause the object to experience non-uniform acceleration.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
734
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
5K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
5K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
1K
Back
Top