Trying to remember an unusual quantum textbook

In summary: Picturing Quantum Processes by Coecke and Kissingerhttps://www.amazon.com/dp/110710422X/?tag=pfamazon01-20If you enjoy it D'Ariano et al's "Quantum Theory from First Principles" uses a similar diagramatic approach but is more concise and...mathematical.
  • #1
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Not sure whether it was a quantum physics, quantum information, or quantum computing textbook

It spent the first few chapters/sections developing some sort of model theory in a very elementary context, in which (multi)functions were represented as boxes and outputs/inputs were represented as lines.

It had two authors from a UK institution (maybe Oxford or Cambridge?) and was published recently (2019 I think)
 
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  • #3
jedishrfu said:
Could it be Susskind's Theoretical Minimum on QM?

It has two authors and starts out with a simple qubit state system, but it was written in 2014.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0465062903/?tag=pfamazon01-20
Nope, I would have remembered Susskind
 
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  • #6
Here’s what ChatGPT says (edit: I’m not even sure it’s a real book)Hi chatgpt I have a question. I’m looking for a book, maybe quantum information, maybe quantum computing, from authors at a UK institution, authored sometime around 2019. The first few chapters develop a model theory using boxes and arrows in the diagrams
Hello! I'll do my best to help you find the book you're looking for. Based on your description, it's possible that you're referring to the book "Quantum Theory, Information and Foundations" by Gerard J. Milburn and Oleg M. Maroney. This book was published in 2019 and is focused on the foundations of quantum theory, including quantum information and quantum computing.
The book uses diagrams with boxes and arrows to explain concepts in quantum information and computation. It covers topics such as quantum gates, quantum algorithms, quantum error correction, and more. Gerard J. Milburn is a physicist and professor at the University of Queensland in Australia, and Oleg M. Maroney is a researcher in quantum information science who has worked at institutions in the UK, including the University of Oxford.
However, please note that the book's content may not be limited to model theory with boxes and arrows, as there may be other diagrams and concepts covered in the book as well. It's always a good idea to double-check the book's contents and reviews to make sure it meets your specific requirements.
 
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  • #7
TeethWhitener said:
Here’s what ChatGPT says (edit: I’m not even sure it’s a real book)Hi chatgpt I have a question. I’m looking for a book, maybe quantum information, maybe quantum computing, from authors at a UK institution, authored sometime around 2019. The first few chapters develop a model theory using boxes and arrows in the diagrams
Hello! I'll do my best to help you find the book you're looking for. Based on your description, it's possible that you're referring to the book "Quantum Theory, Information and Foundations" by Gerard J. Milburn and Oleg M. Maroney. This book was published in 2019 and is focused on the foundations of quantum theory, including quantum information and quantum computing.
The book uses diagrams with boxes and arrows to explain concepts in quantum information and computation. It covers topics such as quantum gates, quantum algorithms, quantum error correction, and more. Gerard J. Milburn is a physicist and professor at the University of Queensland in Australia, and Oleg M. Maroney is a researcher in quantum information science who has worked at institutions in the UK, including the University of Oxford.
However, please note that the book's content may not be limited to model theory with boxes and arrows, as there may be other diagrams and concepts covered in the book as well. It's always a good idea to double-check the book's contents and reviews to make sure it meets your specific requirements.
I don't think that book even exists... 😂
 
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  • #8
But, in a very quantum-ish way, if it did exist, it would be your book.

Have you looked at the Oxbridge faculty list and see if any name triggers memories? That would be more reliable and potentially faster than CrapGPT.
 
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  • #13
Frabjous said:
How about this?
Picturing Quantum Processes by Coecke and Kissinger
https://www.amazon.com/dp/110710422X/?tag=pfamazon01-20
If you enjoy it D'Ariano et al's "Quantum Theory from First Principles" uses a similar diagramatic approach but is more concise and rigorous.
 
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