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Turbulence - just a phenomenon of cavitation?

  1. Jan 21, 2012 #1
    Turbulence -- just a phenomenon of cavitation?

    Is turbulence exclusively cavitation of a fluid?

    Please give me your insight on this idea.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 21, 2012 #2

    boneh3ad

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    Re: Turbulence -- just a phenomenon of cavitation?

    No. Turbulence is a completely separate phenomenon from cavitation. Turbulence has to do with tiny perturbations in a flow growing to the point where the flow becomes highly chaotic.
     
  4. Jan 21, 2012 #3

    Mech_Engineer

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    Re: Turbulence -- just a phenomenon of cavitation?

    Just to add in, cavitation has to do with fluids under high force (as in a boat's prop):

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cavitation
     
  5. Jan 22, 2012 #4

    Bobbywhy

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    Re: Turbulence -- just a phenomenon of cavitation?

    Additionally, cavitation can occur near the face of a high power sonar transducer (transmitter). When the acoustic intensity gets so high that the low-pressure of the wave is strong enough to rip the water apart, it creats tiny bubbles of dissolved gas. Cavitation is "bad" for a sonar system because it creates a huge impedance mismatch between the transducer and the water. Also the imploding bubbles can physically damage the transducer face.

    One interesting sidelight: If the conditions are right the cavitation bubbles will emit a picosecond pulse of light, the color depends on the kinds of dissolved gasses. This is called "sonoluminesence".
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2012
  6. Jan 22, 2012 #5
    Re: Turbulence -- just a phenomenon of cavitation?

    To emphasize what has already been said,

    They are different and unrelated phenomena.
    In particular you need a flowing fluid to exhibit turbulence, it cannot exist in a fluid with no average velocity.
    Turbulence is a property of flow.

    Cavitation, on the other hand can, and does, exist in a tank of standing fluid. It is not a property of flow.

    edit:

    Turbulence can, and does, occur in both liquids and gasses. It can either be a local or global property of the flow.

    Cavitation occurs when the local input of energy to the fluid is sufficient to cause phase change from liquid to gas within the body of the fluid. As such it can only occur in liquids.


    go well
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2012
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