1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

'Unbreakable' encryption introduced

  1. Oct 19, 2008 #1
    I think this is the perfect place to discuss the possibilities of quantum cryptography. It seems to have become a reality now. Let's discuss whether this truly is unbreakable! We've heard it before, but is it different this time?

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/7661311.stm
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2008
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 19, 2008 #2
    No encryption can be "unbreakable."

    This holds by definition.
     
  4. Oct 19, 2008 #3
    So if someone could break it then that would mean we have to rewrite the science books?
     
  5. Oct 19, 2008 #4

    CRGreathouse

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    One-time pad? Quantum entanglement?
     
  6. Oct 19, 2008 #5

    mgb_phys

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    It's not encryption it's only secure fibre links - this is not new (although the range might be a record)
    It does however solve a problem that isn't the problem - it stops you being able to eavesdrop on a fibre by patching into the fibre.
    If you have traffic data encrypted with modern algorithms like AES this isn't a problem.
    The main drawback is that you can still eavesdrop everytime it goes through a switch or router - this technique only works for a single unbroken length of single mode fibre between two points.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2008
  7. Oct 24, 2008 #6

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    I don't see how this would protect from a "man in the middle" attack either. It seems a lot of effort for little benefit.
     
  8. Oct 24, 2008 #7

    mgb_phys

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    It doesn't.

    It's the classic security thing - a technology solution to a human problem.
    eg. the cleaners found someone's password in the trash: solution double the number of bits in the encryption.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: 'Unbreakable' encryption introduced
  1. How to encrypte with C (Replies: 7)

Loading...