Understanding Angular Acceleration in Rigid Bodies Pivoting on a Fixed Axis

In summary, the conversation discusses a problem involving a rigid object and its angular acceleration around a fixed axis. The object is composed of three point masses with different forces acting on them, and the question is whether the answer would be in rad/s squared. The person also asks for clarification on the concept of angular motion for rigid bodies pivoting on a fixed axis.
  • #1
alchemyacoustic
2
0
i haven't been able to figure this one out... i have trouble following the explantion from my instructor. thanks for any help in advance

A rigid object consists of a point mass of 2 kg momentarily located at (-3, 2) m with a force of (6, 2) N acting on it, a second point mass of 3 kg momentarily at (6, -2) m with a force of (3, -4) N acting on it, and a third point mass of 1 kg momentarily at (-2, -5) m with a force of (5, 5) N acting on it. Suppose this rigid three-particle object can only rotate about an axis passing through the origin and perpendicularly the x y plane. (This means the axis also exerts forces on our rigid object.) What is the angular acceleration of our rigid object about this axis?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
would the answer be in rad/s squared?
 
  • #3
alchemyacoustic said:
would the answer be in rad/s squared?

Yes it would. What do you know about the angular motion of rigid bodies that pivot on a fixed axis?
 

Related to Understanding Angular Acceleration in Rigid Bodies Pivoting on a Fixed Axis

What is angular acceleration?

Angular acceleration is a measure of how quickly the angular velocity of an object changes over time. It is a vector quantity, meaning it has both magnitude and direction.

What is the formula for angular acceleration?

The formula for angular acceleration is α = (ω2 - ω1) / (t2 - t1), where α is angular acceleration, ω is angular velocity, and t is time.

How is angular acceleration different from linear acceleration?

Angular acceleration measures the rate of change of angular velocity, while linear acceleration measures the rate of change of linear velocity. Angular acceleration can also be negative, indicating a decrease in angular velocity, while linear acceleration is always positive.

What are some real-world examples of angular acceleration?

Angular acceleration is present in any rotating or spinning object, such as a car tire, a spinning top, or a Ferris wheel. It is also important in sports such as figure skating and gymnastics, where the body is constantly changing direction and rotation.

How is angular acceleration related to torque?

Angular acceleration is directly proportional to torque and inversely proportional to the moment of inertia of an object. This means that a larger torque or a smaller moment of inertia will result in a larger angular acceleration.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
10
Replies
335
Views
9K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
446
Replies
7
Views
363
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
245
Replies
6
Views
952
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
2K
Back
Top