Understanding Multiple IPs with a VPN: The 'X VPN' Experience Explained

  • Thread starter feynman1
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In summary: VPN connections are showing multiple IP addresses. VPN providers are not happy about this as it can be confusing for customers.
  • #1
feynman1
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There's a VPN (let's call it 'X VPN') that somehow shows multiple IPs when connected. Assume when disconnected with the VPN, my local IP is IP0. When connected with the VPN, there are several IPs shown in the VNP: 'assigned local IP' and 'X VPN IP'. Note the 'assigned local IP' appears different from IP0. When searching the internet about the current IP when connected with the VNP, the internet still tells that IP=IP0, neither of the former 2. Why?!
 
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  • #3
  • #4
feynman1 said:
somehow shows multiple IPs when connected

Shows them where? What system / app / command are you using to 'show' your IP address?

And have you checked that the VPN software you are using doesn't create multiple apparent IP addresses intentionally and round-robin packets out it?
 
  • #5
Tghu Verd said:
Shows them where? What system / app / command are you using to 'show' your IP address?

And have you checked that the VPN software you are using doesn't create multiple apparent IP addresses intentionally and round-robin packets out it?
That particular VPN software shows multiple IPs on its panel that are different from what google tells.
For the 2nd question you asked, I don't know.
 
  • #6
You have 2 types of VPN:

1) What you would expect, capture all traffic going to the internet and route it via the VPN.
2) VPN installed but listening on a local TCP port. You need to configure your software (eg browser, e-mail etc) to send traffic to this local port which will then get forwarded via the VPN.

I suspect you have the second kind. For exmaple The Onion Router (TOR) works this way, if you are using the TOR browser bundle you have to use the provided browser to use the VPN or configure your own browser appropriately.

As other have stated, if you can provide more info we can probably assist better.
 
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  • #7
MikeeMiracle said:
As other have stated, if you can provide more info we can probably assist better.

Spot on, @MikeeMiracle. I'm all for being security conscious, but if you're asking for assistance, you need to open the kimono so people can see the wound!

@feynman1, you've not identified anything about your setup, not even the VPN software. Is there a reason for such secrecy?
 
  • #8
Tghu Verd said:
Spot on, @MikeeMiracle. I'm all for being security conscious, but if you're asking for assistance, you need to open the kimono so people can see the wound!

@feynman1, you've not identified anything about your setup, not even the VPN software. Is there a reason for such secrecy?
Thank you. I'm not entirely sure about the setup as that was sth I used years ago and I already forgot.
 
  • #9
feynman1 said:
Thank you. I'm not entirely sure about the setup as that was sth I used years ago and I already forgot.

Aha, that does make it difficult.

About what year are you referring to, as VPN software has changed over the years? And do you recall whether the system was Linux, iOS, Windows, etc? Was this your own computer or a work device?

But if it's so long ago, why are you suddenly interested in trying to figure it out now, @feynman1?
 
  • #10
feynman1 said:
thanks. this only shows my current ip, but doesn't explain my question?
You should check if this address belongs to your internet provider (bad) or your VPN provider (as it should be)
 
  • #11
But he can't check anything. He says it's something he observed years ago.
 
  • #12
Considering the OP observed this a long long time ago in a place he can't remember (ala Bye Bye Miss American Pie) its safe to say that we have answered his questions to the best of our ability and now its time to close this thread.

Thanks to all who participated here.

Jedi
 
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1. What is a VPN and how does it work?

A VPN (Virtual Private Network) is a tool that creates a secure and encrypted connection between your device and the internet. It routes your internet traffic through a remote server, hiding your IP address and encrypting your data to protect your online privacy.

2. Why are multiple IPs important for a VPN?

Multiple IPs are important for a VPN because they allow users to connect to different servers in various locations around the world. This can help to bypass censorship, access geo-restricted content, and improve internet speeds.

3. How does 'X VPN' handle multiple IPs?

'X VPN' uses a network of servers located in different countries to provide users with access to multiple IPs. Users can choose which server to connect to, allowing them to change their IP address and location at any time.

4. What are the benefits of using multiple IPs with a VPN?

Using multiple IPs with a VPN can provide several benefits, such as enhanced online privacy, access to geo-restricted content, improved internet speeds, and increased security against cyber threats.

5. Are there any drawbacks to using multiple IPs with a VPN?

One potential drawback of using multiple IPs with a VPN is that it may slow down your internet connection due to the additional encryption and rerouting of your traffic. Additionally, some websites and services may block access from VPN servers, making it difficult to access certain content.

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