Understanding Pointlike & Local Energy Density

In summary: So in summary, the term for a physical quantity that can be defined at a given point in space is "local" or "pointlike", and in the case of energy density, it would be referred to as "local energy density".
  • #1
bernhard.rothenstein
991
1
How do you name a physical quantity that can be defined at a given point in space: pointlike? local? Say energy density.
 
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  • #2
bernhard.rothenstein said:
How do you name a physical quantity that can be defined at a given point in space: pointlike? local? Say energy density.


Well it's a field. But what kind depends on the type of quantity. Spinor, scalar, tensor, density of weight d, etc.
 
  • #3
Do you actually mean something that can be defined "only at one point"?
Or something "distributional" (like a Dirac delta function)?

Do you have a specific detailed example?
 
  • #4
selfAdjoint said:
Well it's a field. But what kind depends on the type of quantity. Spinor, scalar, tensor, density of weight d, etc.

It seems to be way you use the term "write" It seems okay. Folks you might use the term "word."

Adios

Pete
 
  • #5
point like? punctual?

robphy said:
Do you actually mean something that can be defined "only at one point"?
Or something "distributional" (like a Dirac delta function)?

Do you have a specific detailed example?
I mean density of energy which can be defined in the case of an uniform distribution as ro=m/V but as ro=dm/dV in the case of a nonuniform distribution having well defined magnitudes at different points in space. Do you say that it is a pointlike or punctual physical quantity.
Thanks to al who have answered my question.
 
  • #6
When we have a time-varying quantity and we want to refer specifically to its value at a certain point in time, we often use the word "instantaneous". Are you looking for a similar word to refer to the value of a spatially-varying quantity, at a particular point in space?

In that case, I think the best word would probably be "local", e.g. "local energy density," as opposed to the "average energy density" over a region of space.
 

1. What is pointlike energy density?

Pointlike energy density refers to the amount of energy concentrated at a single point in space. It is often used in theories and models to describe the behavior of particles and their interactions.

2. How is pointlike energy density different from local energy density?

While pointlike energy density focuses on a single point in space, local energy density takes into account the energy distribution over a small region of space. It is a more accurate representation of the energy in a given area, as it considers the energy contributions from multiple points.

3. What factors affect the local energy density?

The local energy density is affected by the types of particles present in a given region, their interactions, and their motion. It is also influenced by external factors such as temperature and pressure.

4. How is the understanding of pointlike and local energy density important in physics?

Pointlike and local energy density are fundamental concepts in physics, particularly in the study of particle interactions and quantum mechanics. They help us understand the behavior of particles and their energies at different points in space, providing insights into the nature of matter and the universe.

5. Are there any practical applications of understanding pointlike and local energy density?

Yes, the understanding of pointlike and local energy density has practical applications in fields such as particle accelerators, nuclear energy, and materials science. It is also used in the development of new technologies and advancements in various industries.

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