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Unified Theory of Everything - Figured Out

  1. Aug 9, 2010 #1
    We all have read that a single theory to possibly fit on a diner napkin or small note card could be available sometime.

    My question to you all, is how does a non-scientist person go about having a legitimate scientist test a theory.

    If I have it figured out, and will require the help of a competent physicist to expose it to the world, what it the best way to do that?

    What I have so far is a framework that allows a new method of approaching the forces of the universe, and as a result general relativity and quantum level forces are no longer a problem.

    I feel if I post it on a board like this, and if it has substance, others might just take it and call it their own.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 9, 2010 #2
    I need to get my popcorns.
     
  4. Aug 9, 2010 #3
    You do not need anybody's help if you have that. Write-up a letter and send it to a prestigious journal. Fame is yours. Once your publication is accepted, please come back here and let us know. Until then, it would be too dangerous, as indeed we would attempt to steal it from you.
     
  5. Aug 9, 2010 #4

    jtbell

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    If you have the genuine solution, then you are more competent than any other physicist in the world, and you don't need any help from the rest of us. Just send it in to a journal like Nature or Phys Rev Letters, as humanino suggested.
     
  6. Aug 9, 2010 #5
    What's more likely? That you have a better understanding of physics than actual physicists? Or that you are misunderstanding something?
     
  7. Aug 9, 2010 #6

    Borg

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    itwillend badly.
     
  8. Aug 9, 2010 #7

    Gokul43201

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    :rofl:

    To the OP, here are the standard options:

    1. Submit a manuscript to the Independent Research Forum here. If the submission meets the formatting guidelines of Tier 1 review, it will proceed to the stage where it is reviewed for scientific merit. If it passes that stage of review, you will have a record of having submitted your ToE here. If someone steals your idea and publishes it, you will merely have to point to the thread here that documents your rightful ownership of the ToE.

    2. Write to a grad student or Prof in the nearest university Physics Department - one that is working in the relevant field. Profs are busy and will typically not find time to look at your paper. If a Grad Student okays it, ask him/her to pass it on to their Advisor.

    3. Submit to a journal.
     
  9. Aug 9, 2010 #8

    ZapperZ

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    Just don't send it to Warren Siegel, because he has received enough number of such things:

    http://insti.physics.sunysb.edu/~siegel/quack.html

    Zz.
     
  10. Aug 9, 2010 #9

    Borek

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  11. Aug 9, 2010 #10

    Gokul43201

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    Or Bob Park, or John Baez.
     
  12. Aug 9, 2010 #11
    I had a prof as an undergrad who had a huge filing cabinets of crackpot papers he'd accumulated over his 40+ year career. If you ever wanted to be amused, just pick on out of the drawer at random.

    I still remember one where the guy claimed that all particles in the universe were just "swirling ether." The faster the swirls swirled, the more massive the particles. His self-proclaimed "revolutionary" theory was laid out in a mere 2 pages and didn't provide a single equation.
     
  13. Aug 9, 2010 #12
    HA ha , too funny, thanks though

    Well if you are any good at probability, than you already know the answer :)

    Ouch :(

    Thank you, option 2 sounds great...
     
  14. Aug 9, 2010 #13

    Evo

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    And if the grad student steals your idea, you have no proof. But I don't think you need to fear anyone stealing your ideas.
     
  15. Aug 9, 2010 #14

    ZapperZ

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    A lot physics departments have such files. I know of one that contains several letters from this guy wanting to know how to obtain the "nomination form for the Nobel Prize", because he has discovered that E=mc^2 = mt^3.

    It does make for a very hilarious reading for both the office staff and a few of us grad students who were bored at that time.

    Zz.
     
  16. Aug 9, 2010 #15

    Borek

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    THERE IS ONE?

    I knew scientists have been hiding something.
     
  17. Aug 9, 2010 #16

    Gokul43201

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    t^3 is time cubed?

    If that is so, the answer to the query is pretty straightforward - nomination forms for the Nobel are handled by this guy --> timecube.com
     
  18. Aug 9, 2010 #17

    He should have made that into a book! My personal favorite is the time cube guy. As far as crackpot TOES, it's the funniest I've seen.

    EDIT: I see Gokul beat me to the punch on that one.
     
  19. Aug 9, 2010 #18

    lisab

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    From that site....

    :eek:
     
  20. Aug 9, 2010 #19

    Ivan Seeking

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    A long time ago I had an idea that I wanted to play out. After seven or eight pages of calculations [based on the critical assumption], the result was the mathematical statement that gravity propagates at velocity C - a somewhat surprising result, esp given the assumption. I quietly filed it and tried to forget about it. :biggrin:

    A prof of mine once described a TOE paper buried somewhere in the archives at OSU. It depended on the notion of infinite integrations, i.e. integral, integral, integral...[to infinity]... integral [function] dx0 dx1 dx2... I suggested that this should be assigned as a homework problem for Calc 2.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2010
  21. Aug 9, 2010 #20
    OK so let's forget my silly notion that I have it figured out. My head hurts so bad right now, I just want to lay down...

    Hopefully you all don't mind some basic questions here instead:

    Why do we age? Has science figured this out yet? I mean I know we know what happens as we break down, but as far as why it begins, why it happens at all, do we have firm answers?

    In the broadest terms for now, collectively what do the four forces achieve within the universe?

    In a balloon theory there is no center of the universe, but does that also mean there is no center of energy? For example, as a human moves, there remains a constant center of mass.
     
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