Use a bubble chamber photo to find collision/decay particles

In summary, the conversation is about a problem #13 on a bubble diagram for an AP Physics 1 class. The student is struggling with understanding the concept as it is not covered in their textbook and they were absent the day it was taught. They have tried googling for help but nothing makes sense. They mention the use of a left/right hand rule to identify the direction of charges and that there are supposed to be x's that signify something. The student is stressed as the test is tomorrow and they are seeking help. Another person suggests a website that can provide assistance. The student thanks them and feels that they now have a better understanding to eliminate incorrect answers on the test.
  • #1
katamaster818
6
0

Homework Statement


Problem #13 on the attached picture (I can't retype a bubble diagram)
526526.jpg


Homework Equations


I honestly have no clue. I know I'm not supposed to say this because I'm supposed to read my textbook first, but this is not covered at all in my textbook, this is a unit my teacher added on to the curriculum, because she thought it would be cool. Furthermore, I was absent the day she taught this, and literally nobody I have asked for help understands how to do this either.

I do know that one person mentioned to me something about a left/right hand rule, to identify the direction of charges.

The Attempt at a Solution


No idea how to start, please, help me lol. I know that there are supposed to be x's that signify something. I also know whenever the lines split, deviate, or curve, some sort of collision has occurred. I've been googling around, but nothing I've found makes any sense to me.

Context: I'm in high school, AP Physics 1, none of this is in my textbook, test is tomorrow, this is one of the practice problems my teacher gave me.
 
Last edited:
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  • #4
Hi Erza it;s Harbinger. hehe just had to say Hi to my buddy.
 

Related to Use a bubble chamber photo to find collision/decay particles

1. What is a bubble chamber photo?

A bubble chamber photo is a type of photograph taken in a particle physics experiment that shows the tracks of subatomic particles as they pass through a superheated liquid or gas. As the particles pass through the chamber, they leave a trail of bubbles which can be captured on film.

2. How are bubble chamber photos used to find collision/decay particles?

Bubble chamber photos are used to find collision/decay particles by analyzing the tracks left by the particles as they pass through the chamber. These tracks can provide information about the mass, charge, and momentum of the particles, which can then be used to identify and study them.

3. What types of particles can be detected using a bubble chamber photo?

A bubble chamber photo can detect a wide range of particles, including electrons, protons, neutrons, mesons, and many others. It can also detect the decay products of these particles, such as photons, neutrinos, and other subatomic particles.

4. How do scientists determine the identities of the particles in a bubble chamber photo?

Scientists determine the identities of particles in a bubble chamber photo by analyzing their tracks and using the laws of physics to calculate their properties. They can also use other data from the experiment, such as the energy and momentum of the particles, to help identify them.

5. What are the advantages of using a bubble chamber photo compared to other methods of particle detection?

One of the main advantages of using a bubble chamber photo is that it can provide a visual representation of the particles and their tracks, making it easier for scientists to analyze and identify them. Additionally, bubble chambers are relatively inexpensive and can be used repeatedly, making them a cost-effective option for particle detection.

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