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Use of quarks in chemistry

  1. May 24, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    Describe the use of quarks in chemistry.

    2. Relevant equations

    N/A (I think?)

    3. The attempt at a solution

    I've tried searching, and can find plenty of information on what the quark is, but I can't find a thing on how it is used. I searched google, google scholars, youtube (hoping for a lecture), and not really sure where to turn to next. Could anybody help?

    Edit - I watched a TED video on string theory, and although it doesn't seem to direct relate to chemistry, would this still be a valid response? According to the speaker it explains things like the mass of particles, gravity, electromagnetic forces, etc.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2009
  2. jcsd
  3. May 24, 2009 #2

    Borek

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    Will you use Newton's law of universal gravitation to describe hydrogen atom?
     
  4. May 24, 2009 #3
    Er..I don't think so? From what I understand, the force of gravity acting upon most things is very minor compared to the other 3 fundamental forces. However, the TED speaker said there was 20+ things that string theory would reveal or at least confirm, do these have anything to do with chemistry?
     
  5. May 24, 2009 #4

    Borek

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    Very good.

    Now, what is energy scale required to observe individual quarks?
     
  6. May 24, 2009 #5
    What do you mean by observe individual quarks? I thought that was impossible, because quarks were confined within the baryon or meson? (I'm not really sure, that's just what I got out of reading a bit of "Introductory to Elementary Particles")
     
  7. May 24, 2009 #6

    Borek

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    You are right about quarks being confined - I don't mean isolating them, but observing - there are experiments where we can 'see' effects of the quark presence. What energies are required for that?
     
  8. May 24, 2009 #7
    I seem to remember reading somewhere that, when using a particle accelerator, protons being collided would show distinct properties of the presence of quarks within the proton. I'm not even sure if that's right/relevant, it's just one of the many things I read today. But even if that is right, wouldn't that be more to do with a use in physics rather than chemistry?
     
  9. May 24, 2009 #8

    Borek

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    You are on the right track.

    How do energies used in the particle accelerators compare to energies in chemistry?
     
  10. May 24, 2009 #9
    I'm really not sure about what kinds of energies are used in particle accelerators. For Chemistry, all I can really think of is electrostatic attraction that occurs when there is an ionic bond (although my brain is pretty fried at this point, so I guarantee there's others I'm forgetting).
     
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