Using Hess's Law to calculate ΔH°rxn

  • #1

Homework Statement


Calculate ΔH°rxn in kJ/mol for:

C3H8(g) + 4 CO2(g) + 4 H2(g) → C7H16(g) + 4 O2(g)

from the following given values of ΔH°rxn:

C3H8(g) + 5 O2(g) → 3 CO2(g) + 4 H2O(g) ΔH°rxn= -2,010 kJ/mol

C7H16(g) + 11 O2(g) → 7 CO2(g) + 8 H2O(g) ΔH°rxn= -4,426 kJ/mol

H2(g) + ½ O2(g) → H2O(g) ΔH°rxn= -241.8 kJ/mol


Homework Equations



None

The Attempt at a Solution



I swapped the middle to give +4,426 kJ/mol. Then I tried multiplying the middle by 1/2 and the third one by 4. Am I on the right track? Anything else need to be swapped? I feel like the next step should be obvious; I'm just stuck.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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4,546

Homework Statement


Calculate ΔH°rxn in kJ/mol for:

C3H8(g) + 4 CO2(g) + 4 H2(g) → C7H16(g) + 4 O2(g)

from the following given values of ΔH°rxn:

C3H8(g) + 5 O2(g) → 3 CO2(g) + 4 H2O(g) ΔH°rxn= -2,010 kJ/mol

C7H16(g) + 11 O2(g) → 7 CO2(g) + 8 H2O(g) ΔH°rxn= -4,426 kJ/mol

H2(g) + ½ O2(g) → H2O(g) ΔH°rxn= -241.8 kJ/mol


Homework Equations



None

The Attempt at a Solution



I swapped the middle to give +4,426 kJ/mol. Then I tried multiplying the middle by 1/2 and the third one by 4. Am I on the right track? Anything else need to be swapped? I feel like the next step should be obvious; I'm just stuck.
You almost have it. Just don't multiply the middle one by 1/2.
 
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  • #3
Ahh, okay thanks! I solved it by swapping the middle and just multiplying the bottom by 4. I figured out what stumped me; it was not knowing how to get the unwanted compounds in the reactions to cancel out. I get it now though.
 

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