I Van der Waals force in quantum physics

According to QFT, are there hydrogen bonds or Van der Waals force? Or this an outdated concept of classical physics?
 

Demystifier

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Those are quantum effects that cannot be explained by classical physics.
 
I agree Demystifier is correct. I have a little different way of conceptualizing the molecular bonding mechanism. I'll use (H²O) Water to expand my point, (H²) Hydrogen and (O²)Oxygen bind and emerges Water (H²O) molecule(s). The convergent of the water remaining intact is a result of Covalent and Ionic bonds. These molecular bonds are referred to as force(s), -- electrostatic force. This electrostatic force is just the description and name of the 'covalent and ionic bonding' cause but they are NOT van der Waals' forces. The van der Waals' forces are the forces that exist between the millions of separate water molecules, and not between the hydrogen and oxygen atoms in the case of water. Dipole Dipole forces occur in polar molecules, that is, molecules that have an unequal sharing of electrons. To Emphasize - HCl comprised of the atom Hydrogen and Chlorine is polar. The Chlorine atom has an extra electron, which came from the hydrogen atom. Because of this, the chlorine part of the molecule is negatively charged, and the hydrogen side of the molecule is positively charged.
 

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