Verify my understanding about polarization match of RHC antenna.

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of polarization match in the context of antenna design and radiation patterns. The first attachment provides the text from Balanis explaining polarization in receiving mode, while the second attachment includes the individual's interpretation through drawings and writing. The drawings show two RHC antennas, with the transmitting antenna located at the origin and the receiving antenna located along the z-axis pointing back to the origin. The direction of rotation for each antenna is shown in different figures, with the receiving antenna rotating clockwise due to its placement. The ellipse locus of the transmitting and receiving antennas are shown to be mirror images of each other, with the z-axis pointing out of the paper in all figures. The individual also asks for further clarification and resources on the topic
  • #1
yungman
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I have been trying to understand polarization match in the text from Balanis. The first attachment is the text scanned from the text explaining the polarization of an antenna in RECEIVING mode. I try to understand what the book said and I came up with my interpretation in my writing and drawings in the second attachment.

For point #2a in the text, I drew in Fig.1 to show two RHC antennas. The transmitting antenna is called RHC-A located at the origin and transmit at +z direction as shown. I show the E as rotating counter clockwise (CCW) as in Fig.2 where +z is coming out of the paper. The receiving antenna is called RHC-B and is located somewhere alone the z axis pointing back to the origin. The receiving antenna RHC-B being RHC, the direction of rotation is shown in Fig.3 as being rotating clockwise (CW) for obvious reason...because it is pointing at the origin alone the -z direction.

For #2b in the text, I use the same two antenna in Fig.1. The ellipse locus traced out by the E of the transmitting antenna RHC-A is shown in Fig.4 with TILT angle δ shown. The ellipse locus of the receiving antenna RHC-B is shown in Fig.5. The reason the ellipse is a MIRROR image of the transmitting antenna is because...again, the receiving antenna is pointing to the origin.

It is important in Fig.2, 3, 4 and 5, the z-axis is pointing out of the paper. Please tell me whether my interpretation is correct or not.
 

Attachments

  • Polarize text L.png
    Polarize text L.png
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  • Polarized drawing L1.png
    Polarized drawing L1.png
    64.8 KB · Views: 518
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  • #2
Anyone? I have been surfing around looking for good explanation of why both tx and rx antenna have to have same circular or elliptical polarization. If anyone have a good article, please give me the link.

Thanks

Alan
 

Related to Verify my understanding about polarization match of RHC antenna.

1. What is polarization match?

Polarization match refers to the alignment of the electric field of an antenna with the electric field of the incoming electromagnetic wave. A perfect polarization match occurs when the two fields are parallel, resulting in maximum signal strength.

2. How is polarization match measured?

Polarization match can be measured using a polarization analyzer, which measures the angle between the electric field of the antenna and the incoming wave. This angle is known as the polarization mismatch angle.

3. Why is polarization match important?

Polarization match is important because it affects the strength and quality of the received signal. If there is a mismatch between the polarization of the antenna and the incoming wave, it can result in signal loss and reduced performance of the antenna.

4. How can polarization match be achieved?

Polarization match can be achieved by adjusting the orientation of the antenna to match the polarization of the incoming wave. This can be done by rotating the antenna or using a polarization rotator.

5. What is the difference between RHC and LHC polarization?

RHC (right-hand circular) and LHC (left-hand circular) polarization refer to the direction of rotation of the electric field of an antenna. RHC antennas rotate the electric field clockwise, while LHC antennas rotate it counterclockwise. The choice of polarization depends on the application and the polarization of the incoming wave.

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