Volume of Oxygen Liberated from Hydrogen Peroxide

In summary, the conversation discusses the breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to form water and oxygen, and the labeling of hydrogen peroxide bottles as 10 volume or 3%. Using mole equations and density, it is determined that 1L of a 3% solution would produce approximately 10L of oxygen at STP. There is a 2:1 ratio between hydrogen peroxide and oxygen, and the molar mass of hydrogen peroxide is used to calculate the moles of oxygen produced. This calculation is in line with the question's estimate of 10L.
  • #1
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Homework Statement


Hydrogen peroxide breaks down easily to give water and oxygen as follows:
2H2O2(aq)----> 2H2O2(l) + O2(g)
Bottles of hydrogen peroxide are sometimes labelled as 10 volume as well as 3%. This means the volume of oxygen that can be liberated is 10 times the volume of the solution. Remembering that 1 mol at STP of any gas occupies 22.4L, calculate the volume of oxygen at STP that could be produced from 1L of a 3% solution. Is 10L a good approximation to your answer?

Homework Equations


2H2O2(aq)----> 2H2O2(l) + O2(g)
3% refers to 3g/100mL
Mole equations and density

The Attempt at a Solution


Knowing that I have a 1L solution, I make 3g/100ml into 30g/L.
Working from there, I divide 30g H2O2 by the molar mass, 34g/mol, to find moles of H2O2.
The equation states there is a 2:1 ratio between hydrogen peroxide and oxygen, so I divide the moles by 2.
I then multiply the moles of Oxygen by 22.4 to find the volume, which I find is 9.88L (in line with the question's estimate of 10L as well).

I quite literally just thought of this possible solution when I was posting this for help. I'm uncertain as to whether or not I went about this properly, particularly in finding the grams of H2O2 in the 1L solution.

As always, appreciate any help on the matter.
 
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  • #2
brbrett said:
2H2O2(aq)----> 2H2O2(l) + O2(g)

Beware - you are not producing H2O2 but H2O (but I suppose it just a typo).

Knowing that I have a 1L solution, I make 3g/100ml into 30g/L.
Working from there, I divide 30g H2O2 by the molar mass, 34g/mol, to find moles of H2O2.
The equation states there is a 2:1 ratio between hydrogen peroxide and oxygen, so I divide the moles by 2.
I then multiply the moles of Oxygen by 22.4 to find the volume, which I find is 9.88L (in line with the question's estimate of 10L as well).

Looks OK.
 
  • #3
Yes. I assume I copied it down wrong, but I left it like that just in case.
Thanks for the help!
 

1. What is the purpose of measuring the volume of oxygen liberated from hydrogen peroxide?

The volume of oxygen liberated from hydrogen peroxide is an important measurement in various scientific experiments and reactions. It helps determine the amount of oxygen released during a reaction, which can indicate the efficiency of the reaction or the concentration of the reactants.

2. How is the volume of oxygen liberated from hydrogen peroxide measured?

The volume of oxygen liberated from hydrogen peroxide can be measured using a gas collection method. This involves placing the hydrogen peroxide in a container and adding a catalyst to facilitate the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water. The oxygen gas is then collected in a graduated cylinder or gas syringe and its volume is recorded.

3. What factors can affect the volume of oxygen liberated from hydrogen peroxide?

The volume of oxygen liberated from hydrogen peroxide can be affected by various factors such as the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide, the amount and type of catalyst used, and the temperature of the reaction. The rate of reaction can also impact the volume of oxygen released.

4. What are some common applications of measuring the volume of oxygen liberated from hydrogen peroxide?

Measuring the volume of oxygen liberated from hydrogen peroxide is commonly used in various industries, such as the production of bleaching agents and rocket fuel. It is also used in medical and laboratory settings to analyze enzyme activity and determine the concentration of certain substances in a sample.

5. How can the volume of oxygen liberated from hydrogen peroxide be used in environmental studies?

The volume of oxygen liberated from hydrogen peroxide can be used to study the decomposition of organic matter in water bodies. This can help determine the level of pollution in the water and the effectiveness of water treatment processes. It can also be used to assess the health of aquatic organisms and their response to pollutants.

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