Wave function collapse in a double slit experiment

  • #1
Is anyone did experiment on wave function collapse in double slit experiment. Could you please share information about that, and also share research paper about that experiment.
What kind of observation done here, what kind of equipment used for that?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Nugatory
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Do remember that wave function collapse is not, strictly speaking, part the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics. It's one of several ways of talking about what the math says happens during an interaction with macroscopic objects (such as a barrier with slits in it, or a measuring device)and it's perfectly possible to do QM without collapse.

But with that said, just about any form of the double slit experiment with discrete particles (if you're doing it with light instead of discrete particles you aren't demonstrating QM at all, you're replicating Young's classical experiment from 1805 that shows the wave nature of light) shows the effect that we call wave function collapse. If two paths are available to the particles, an interference pattern will form; if only one path is available the pattern will not form. In collapse interpretations we say that whatever interaction excluded one path (for example, triggering or not triggering a detector at one or the other slit) collapsed the wave function from "superposition of both paths" to "just the one possible path".

Googling for "single photon double slit" will lead to to some actual experiments.
 
  • #3
Do remember that wave function collapse is not, strictly speaking, part the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics. It's one of several ways of talking about what the math says happens during an interaction with macroscopic objects (such as a barrier with slits in it, or a measuring device)and it's perfectly possible to do QM without collapse.

But with that said, just about any form of the double slit experiment with discrete particles (if you're doing it with light instead of discrete particles you aren't demonstrating QM at all, you're replicating Young's classical experiment from 1805 that shows the wave nature of light) shows the effect that we call wave function collapse. If two paths are available to the particles, an interference pattern will form; if only one path is available the pattern will not form. In collapse interpretations we say that whatever interaction excluded one path (for example, triggering or not triggering a detector at one or the other slit) collapsed the wave function from "superposition of both paths" to "just the one possible path".

Googling for "single photon double slit" will lead to to some actual experiments.
Why not diffraction patterns seen when single Photon going to single slit.?
 
  • #4
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A single photon will give a single hit only, not a pattern. In interpretations with a collapse that is the collapse.
Many individual photons sent through a single slit will give a single-slit pattern.
 
  • #5
A single photon will give a single hit only, not a pattern. In interpretations with a collapse that is the collapse.
Many individual photons sent through a single slit will give a single-slit pattern.
I know that. I want to ask, decoherence occur when we observe double slit experiment. In there photons distribute along with each slit. Why don't we observe diffraction pattern in single slit after decoherence.
interference pattern occur when a photon superpose to them self, then what is the reason of diffraction pattern in single slit experiment if we use single photon at a time.
 
  • #6
Do remember that wave function collapse is not, strictly speaking, part the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics. It's one of several ways of talking about what the math says happens during an interaction with macroscopic objects (such as a barrier with slits in it, or a measuring device)and it's perfectly possible to do QM without collapse.

But with that said, just about any form of the double slit experiment with discrete particles (if you're doing it with light instead of discrete particles you aren't demonstrating QM at all, you're replicating Young's classical experiment from 1805 that shows the wave nature of light) shows the effect that we call wave function collapse. If two paths are available to the particles, an interference pattern will form; if only one path is available the pattern will not form. In collapse interpretations we say that whatever interaction excluded one path (for example, triggering or not triggering a detector at one or the other slit) collapsed the wave function from "superposition of both paths" to "just the one possible path".

Googling for "single photon double slit" will lead to to some actual experiments.
What is mechanism of sensor which lead to decoherence.
 
  • #7
Nugatory
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Why don't we observe diffraction pattern in single slit after decoherence.
We do.
We design our experiments around two-slit interference because the one-slit diffraction pattern is harder to calculate and less easily measured than the two-slit interference pattern and doesn't tell us anything that we won't learn from the double-slit measurement. But single-slit diffraction is there if we look for it.
 

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