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Wavelength for highest radiation per unit wavelength

  1. Sep 29, 2013 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    At what wavelength does a cavity at 6000 degrees Kelvin radiate most per unit wavelength?


    2. Relevant equations
    $$\rho_T(\lambda)d\lambda=\frac{8\pi{hc}}{\lambda^5}\frac{d\lambda}{e^{{hc}/{\lambda{kT}}}-1}$$


    3. The attempt at a solution
    I'm pretty new to this whole topic, so don't judge me if I'm totally off...
    First off can't the $$d\lambda$$'s cancel each other out? I'm not sure why the book I am using writes this equation like they did if they could cancel out that easily, but anyways I got rid of them because it seems to just make this more confusing for me otherwise.
    So I figured if it wants the wavelength for highest radiation (per unit wavelength), I should take the derivative of $$\rho_T(\lambda)d\lambda$$ with respect to the wavelength, and set that expression equal to zero.
    However now I am at an impasse, seeing as how solving for lambda would probably be really difficult, and I am not even sure if I am working in the correct direction. Any help would be appreciated much. Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 29, 2013 #2

    Dick

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    You are working in the correct direction. Differentiate ##\rho_T(\lambda)## and set it equal to zero. It is hard to solve. But if you set ##x=\frac{hc}{\lambda{kT}}## and express the whole expression in terms of the dimensionless variable x you'll get a single equation for x you can solve numerically. See Wien's Displacement Law.
     
  4. Sep 29, 2013 #3
    I actually did all that a bit ago and solved to get a wavelength of 4798 angstroms, aka blue light. Sounds about right. Then about 20 seconds ago I just realized I could have avoided that whole mess and simply used Wien's Displacement Law. Got me the same exact answer. -_- oh well
     
  5. Sep 29, 2013 #4
    By the way, I am not new to LaTeX but how do you write an equation on this site without using the double dollar signs? Obviously "\(___\)" doesn't work...
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2013
  6. Sep 29, 2013 #5

    Dick

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    Use double '#' signs if you want the math to stay on the same line.
     
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