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Waves in a string

  1. May 11, 2009 #1
    a third harmonic of a 50g guitar string oscillates at a frequency of 1280hz. the wavelength is 30cm
    determine the tension in the string and the string length.

    my attempt:
    the 3rd harmonic of a guitar string is 3/2 times the wavelength so the length of the string is 45cm.
    so mass per unit length is .05/.45=.111kg/m
    v=f(lambda)
    so v =384ms^1
    V=sqrt(T/mu)
    so 384=sqrt(T/.111)
    T therefore is =16367.616N
    isnt this value for tension too large to be correct?
    where am i going wrong?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 11, 2009 #2
    I can't spot an error, the original question sounds plausible
    and yet this tension is ridiculously high.
    50g sounds a bit heavy, but even so...
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2009
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