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We've came a long way with inverters

  1. Feb 22, 2012 #1

    dlgoff

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    While looking into the early electrolytic rectifiers inspired by tiny-tims post in the "Question about polarized capacitors" thread, I got to thinking about these mechanical vibrators used in early auto radios for generating a.c.

    http://www.redwoodradio.com/images/Radio_Vib_400.jpg

    I bet there are a few old members here that remember them?
     
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  3. Feb 22, 2012 #2

    Bobbywhy

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    I have replaced many of them in car radios. I noticed that the "vibrator" pictured operates on 6 Volts! That's really an ancient relic... a museum piece!
     
  4. Feb 22, 2012 #3

    jim hardy

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    "I bet there are a few old members here that remember them?"

    takes me right back to my '49 Buick Roadmaster.....
    push-pull 6V6's and a Jensen speaker in rear deck.
    WVCG was local classical music station..
     
  5. Feb 22, 2012 #4

    Averagesupernova

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    They were not only used in car radios they were used in large console radios as well. Back in the day alot of places did not have comercial power available so radios were manufactured to run on batteries. They used tubes that had a 1 volt filament or very close to this, all in series. I have one, it works other than having a bad audio output transformer. Of course this was after cleaning up the points in the vibrator. THE hardest metal I have ever run a file across.
     
  6. Feb 22, 2012 #5

    dlgoff

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    We both are probably museum pieces. :devil:

    Ah. The 6V6. Makes me want to touch B+. :surprised

    I guess I don't remember seeing any of these. :cool:
     
  7. Feb 22, 2012 #6

    Averagesupernova

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    See? You aren't that old. Haha.
     
  8. Feb 22, 2012 #7

    jim hardy

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    i have a couple battery sets in barn, they use #30 tube with a "B" battery

    Hammond still makes a nice line of tube output transformers......
    http://www.hammondmfg.com/5caud.htm
     
  9. Feb 22, 2012 #8

    dlgoff

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    I remember my parents having a battery operated "portable" tube radio. If I remember correctly, it used a 96 volt battery. I was very young and don't remember hearing a vibrator.
     
  10. Feb 23, 2012 #9

    Averagesupernova

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    Thanks for the link Jim. I am familiar with Hammond because of their enclosures but until now the output transformer had been low enough on the priority list so I had not really given it a thought. But it was nice to have been given a reminder.
     
  11. Feb 23, 2012 #10

    cmb

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    Rotary converters still have their place in the scope of inverter technology. Benefits include buffering of input power and pure sinusoid output. These were amongst the very first AC-DC/DC-AC converter devices.
     
  12. Feb 23, 2012 #11

    jim hardy

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    indeed, and their overload characteristics for fault clearing are better. We used one with a half ton flywheel for "ride through"
     
  13. Feb 26, 2012 #12

    NascentOxygen

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    It probably used two batteries, the high voltage one and a low voltage low impedance battery for the filaments. Maybe it clipped to a car battery for a longer life?

    The vibrator allowed a car battery to operate a valve radio, by chopping the DC and feeding it through a transformer. Vibrators are wasteful.
     
  14. Feb 26, 2012 #13

    turbo

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    My father's cars (yes, starting back in the 50s) had 6v6 output tubes for a long time. DELCO made a lot of car radios. It took a while to get them warmed up, but they were quite reliable and durable. I used to try to repair and restore smaller guitar amps when I was a kid (HS-age) and I certainly wasn't above going through the local car bone-yards to scavenge tubes!
     
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