What American English Sounds Like to Non-English Speakers

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In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of gibberish versions of different languages and how they sound to those who do not speak them. The topic is further explored through a song in gibberish American English from the 1970s, with the conclusion that it doesn't sound particularly strange or funny due to the unintelligible lyrics of many English songs.
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CAC1001

So I have heard gibberish versions of languages, such as gibberish German or gibberish Japanese and gibberish Chinese, and even gibberish Russian (where you can't tell that someone isn't speaking the real language if you don't speak it). So I have always wondered what American English sounds like to other languages. Here is a song done in gibberish American English from the 1970s:

 
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Lol! Nice.
 
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CAC1001 said:
So I have heard gibberish versions of languages, such as gibberish German or gibberish Japanese and gibberish Chinese, and even gibberish Russian (where you can't tell that someone isn't speaking the real language if you don't speak it). So I have always wondered what American English sounds like to other languages. Here is a song done in gibberish American English from the 1970s:


That video rocks!

Still, since half the lyrics of all songs in English are unintelligible even to Americans, it didn't sound particularly strange or funny.
 
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I can say that the perception of American English by non-English speakers is likely influenced by a combination of factors such as cultural exposure, linguistic background, and personal experiences. It is also important to note that there is no one "gibberish" version of American English, as it can vary depending on the individual or group creating it.

That being said, the song in gibberish American English from the 1970s may sound like a mix of familiar and unfamiliar sounds to non-English speakers. The rhythm and cadence may be recognizable as English, but the specific words and phrases may be unintelligible. This could be due to the use of English phonemes and intonation patterns, but without the meaning and context behind them, they may sound like nonsense.

It is also possible that the song may sound different to different non-English speakers, as they may have different perceptions and associations with American English. For example, someone from a country with a similar language structure to English may have an easier time understanding the gibberish, while someone from a completely different language background may struggle to make any sense of it.

Overall, the perception of American English as gibberish is likely influenced by a combination of factors and can vary among individuals. As scientists, we can continue to study and understand the complexities of language and how it is perceived by different cultures and individuals.
 

1. What makes American English sound unique compared to other English dialects?

American English has its own distinct pronunciation and intonation patterns, influenced by the country's history, culture, and regional accents. It also has a large vocabulary of slang and colloquial expressions that may be unfamiliar to non-English speakers.

2. How do American English speakers typically pronounce certain words?

American English is known for its rhoticity, meaning the "r" sound is pronounced in words like "car" and "hard". It also has a tendency to drop the final "g" sound in words like "walking" or "talking". Additionally, there are variations in vowel sounds, such as the pronunciation of "a" in words like "dance" and "ask".

3. Is there a specific accent that is associated with American English?

While there is no one definitive American English accent, the Midwestern accent is often considered the most "neutral" and widely understood. Other accents, such as Southern or New York, may be more recognizable and associated with certain regions or cultural stereotypes.

4. How do non-English speakers typically perceive the American English accent?

Many non-English speakers may find the American English accent to be fast-paced and difficult to understand, especially when compared to other English accents like British or Australian. The use of slang and colloquialisms may also add to the challenge of understanding the accent.

5. Can non-English speakers easily learn to speak American English?

While learning any new language can be challenging, with dedication and practice, non-English speakers can certainly learn to speak American English fluently. It may require some adjustment and getting used to the unique pronunciation and intonation patterns, but with exposure and immersion, it is achievable.

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