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Featured What are great places in US or UK for a physicist to visit?

  1. Oct 24, 2017 #1
    As the title says, any ideas of great places that a physicist tourist could visit in US or UK?

    I have been thinking about the Cavendish laboratory, Cambridge University, but I don't know whether it's open for visitors.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 24, 2017 #2
    Isaac Newton's childhood home, Woolsthorpe Manor, is located just south of Grantham in England. It's worth a visit if only to see the iconic apple tree.
     
  4. Oct 24, 2017 #3

    Tom.G

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    Perhaps rather far down on your list, the Corning Glass Works in Corning, New York, USA. That is where the 200 inch mirror for the Mount Palomar Observatory was made. The one in use is the second try. The first one cracked during manufacture and is on display.
    Museum: https://www.cmog.org
    Home: http://www.corning.com/worldwide/en.html
     
  5. Oct 26, 2017 #4

    Ryan_m_b

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    Of interest to many scientists (and non-scientists) would be Bletchley park
    https://bletchleypark.org.uk/

    It's the site of the enigma machine and where Alan Turing worked during the war. It's about an hour's drive north of London (or a shorter train) and has been converted into a museum.
     
  6. Oct 26, 2017 #5

    ZapperZ

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    Your title is vague. Define "great places".

    Zz.
     
  7. Oct 26, 2017 #6
    Thanks to everyone so far
    Places where a scientist, in this case a physicist, would enjoy visiting and would find interesting to know.
     
  8. Oct 26, 2017 #7

    Nidum

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    All the Science Museums and Aerospace museums . There is a wonderful collection of such places in the UK .
     
  9. Oct 26, 2017 #8

    ZapperZ

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    Still doesn't clarify the set of criteria here. I'm a physicist, and I enjoy visiting Walt Disney World in Orlando, FL. Does it qualify as a "great place" then?

    Zz.
     
  10. Oct 26, 2017 #9

    fresh_42

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    Yes. I would even go further and say: any place is a great place, because physics is basically everywhere and maybe even far more than in any dusty laboratory used by a great physicist centuries ago.
     
  11. Oct 26, 2017 #10

    ZapperZ

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    This is fine and dandy, but one has to be CONSCIOUS of the "greatness" of it within the physics context. Ask the general public on how many of them think that physics research has anything to do with their smart phones. You'd be surprised.

    So just because we here know of the connection to physics, it doesn't mean that it is obvious to others. If it isn't, then the connection might as well not exist.

    My point here is that "great places" is undefined, and it has different meanings and criteria to different people. The OP needs to explain what HE considers to be great places in physics. I, on the other hand, can point to what the APS considers to be "historic sites". And they explain in detail what they consider to be such a site, and continues to get nominations for more of them. There's quite a bit more elaboration on the details here, not just simply throw out "great places" and forces the rest of us to do the tedious work of interpretating what that could possibly mean.

    My backyard is a great place!

    Zz.
     
  12. Oct 26, 2017 #11
  13. Oct 26, 2017 #12

    jtbell

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    Working laboratories that offer tours? Science-oriented museums? Historical sites and monuments? Or all of them?

    In the "museums" category, when I was in New Mexico a few years ago I visited the Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos and the National Museum of Nuclear Science and History in Albuquerque, both of which have large exhibits about the Manhattan Project (development of the atomic bomb).
     
  14. Oct 27, 2017 #13

    ISamson

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    Greenwich observatory?
    This is more for an astronomer thought...
     
  15. Oct 27, 2017 #14

    tech99

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    The Old Greenwich Observatory is very interesting to most people, as it has the Greenwich Meridian and historic links from 1676. Names associated with it include Christpher Wren, Samuel Pepys, Newton, Flamsteed and Robert Hooke. It contains some wonderful working clocks from the endeavours to make a chronograph for longitude fixing at sea. It is located near the last clipper ship, "Cutty Sark" and the National Maritime Museum.
    It is also possible to visit Michael Faraday's Laboratory at the Royal Institution in London.Here he discovered electromagnetic induction, made the first motor and made Benzene, amongst many other achievements. He said that light seems to be magnetic - a long time before Maxwell!
     
  16. Oct 27, 2017 #15

    fresh_42

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    Didn't Cutty Sark burn down a couple of years ago?
     
  17. Oct 27, 2017 #16
  18. Oct 27, 2017 #17

    tech99

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    They had a bad fire in 2007 but it was found that much of the valuable parts of the ship had been sent away for restoration so it was not as bad as feared. A smaller fire took place in 2014 but the ship is now fully restored.
     
  19. Oct 27, 2017 #18
  20. Oct 28, 2017 #19
    I agree with ISsamson and tech99. Greenwich has a great park, interesting pubs and a market and the place is full of history. You could spend hours browsing around the National Maritime Museum. Make sure you visit Goddards for some pie mash and liquor, traditional cockney grub. Yum.
     
  21. Oct 28, 2017 #20

    ISamson

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    In USA probably NASA launchpad or something.

    Royal observatory in Britain?
     
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