What can stop jalapeno burn to skin?

  • Thread starter Evo
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Is your hand still burning?
From an event that happened on October 25, 2008? Don't think so, but I'm sure she appreciates your concern. :)
 

rhody

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Ok, curiosity got the best of me before Monique had a chance to respond: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRPV1" [Broken]
Sensitization

The sensitivity of TRPV1 to noxious stimuli, such as high temperatures or low pH, is not static. Upon tissue damage and the consequent inflammation, a number of inflammatory mediators, such as various prostaglandins and bradykinin, are released. These agents increase the sensitivity of TRPV1 to noxious stimuli. This manifests as an increased sensitivity to painful stimuli (hyperalgesia) or pain sensation in response to non-painful stimuli allodynia. Most sensitizing pro-inflammatory agents activate the phospholipase C pathway. Phopshorylation of TRPV1 by protein kinase C have been shown to play a role in sensitzation of TRPV1.
[edit] Desensitization

Upon prolonged exposure to capsaicin, TRPV1 activity decreases, a phenomenon called desensitization. Extracellular calcium ions are required for this phenomenon, thus influx of calcium and the consequentual increase of intracellular calcium mediate this effect. Various signaling pathways such as calmodulin and calcineurin, and the decrease of PIP2, have been implicated in desensitization of TRPV1. Desensitization of TRPV1 is thought to underlie the paradoxical analgesic effect of capsaicin.
and
Agonists

Agonists such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin activate TRPV1, and, upon prolonged application TRPV1 activity, would decrease (desensitization), leading to alleviation of pain. Agonists can be applied locally to the painful area as through a patch or an ointment. Numerous capsaicin-containing creams are available over the counter, containing low concentrations of capsaicin (0.025 - 0.075 %). It is debated whether these preparations actually lead to TRPV1 desensitization, it is possible that they act via counter-irritation. Novel preparations containing higher capsaicin concentration (up to 10%) are under clinical trials [17]
[edit] Central nervous system

TRPV1 is also expressed at high levels in the central nervous system and has been proposed as a target for treatment not only of pain but also for other conditions such as anxiety.[18] Furthermore TRPV1 appears to mediate long term depression (LTD) in the hippocampus.[19] LTD has been linked to a decrease in the ability to make new memories, unlike its opposite long term potentiation (LTP), which aids in memory formation. A dynamic pattern of LTD and LTP occurring at many synapses provides a code for memory formation. Long-term depression and subsequent pruning of synapses with reduced activity is an important aspect of memory formation. In rat brain slices, activation of TRV1 with heat or capsaicin induced LTD while capsazepine blocked capsaicin's ability to induce LTD.[19] In the brain stem (solitary tract nucleus), TRPV1 controls the asynchronous and spontaneous release of glutamate from unmyelinated cranial visceral afferents - release processes that are active at normal temperatures and hence quite distinct from TRPV1 responses in painful heat [20]. Hence there may be therapeutic potential in modulating TRPV1 in the central nervous system, perhaps as a treatment for epilepsy (TRPV1 is already a target in the peripheral nervous system for pain relief).
So it seems that capsaicin when applied in small doses, (0.025 - 0.075 %), and Novel preparations containing higher capsaicin concentration (up to 10%) are under clinical trials can lead to desensitization (blocking of TRPV1), reducing pain. So it seems to a layman that capsaicin is a double edged sword. It can cause intense pain, and prolonged low level exposure can lead to alleviation of it.

finally:
Central nervous system

TRPV1 is also expressed at high levels in the central nervous system and has been proposed as a target for treatment not only of pain but also for other conditions such as anxiety.[18] Furthermore TRPV1 appears to mediate long term depression (LTD) in the hippocampus.[19] LTD has been linked to a decrease in the ability to make new memories, unlike its opposite long term potentiation (LTP), which aids in memory formation. A dynamic pattern of LTD and LTP occurring at many synapses provides a code for memory formation. Long-term depression and subsequent pruning of synapses with reduced activity is an important aspect of memory formation. In rat brain slices, activation of TRV1 with heat or capsaicin induced LTD while capsazepine blocked capsaicin's ability to induce LTD.[19] In the brain stem (solitary tract nucleus), TRPV1 controls the asynchronous and spontaneous release of glutamate from unmyelinated cranial visceral afferents - release processes that are active at normal temperatures and hence quite distinct from TRPV1 responses in painful heat [20]. Hence there may be therapeutic potential in modulating TRPV1 in the central nervous system, perhaps as a treatment for epilepsy (TRPV1 is already a target in the peripheral nervous system for pain relief).
It appears that capsaicin's use in reducing TRPV1 could be involved in:

mediating long term depression
as a treatment for epilepsy

Interesting findings... I am open to a high level layman's description to this.

Rhody...
 
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turbo

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I don't know how all this works. The first time I handled home-grown habaneros, I had some persistent burn (until the next day). Since then, I have never had a problem stemming, de-seeding, etc. I never use gloves. Maybe I'm just a bit more cognizant of not getting the chili juices on my skin. In good years (good pepper crop) I'll make gallons of chili sauces and chili relishes, can them, and process them in a boiling -water bath.

If police tried to use pepper spray on me and didn't get any directly in my eyes, I'd probably be able to run away. I like the heat.
 

JBAB

I suggested to my neighbor who was in much pain from processing jalapeno peppers without gloves who had been using ice for hours that she wet her hands and pack on baking soda. She called back about 15 minutes later and said the burning was 100% better.

We read all the good advice in this thread and I did not see this, so I have added our experience. Since baking soda works really well on bee stings, etc, which are acids, I assumed it would work on capsacin.
JBAB
 

lexilou

This really works!!!

I chopped jalepenos and rubbed the bottom of my nose. When I felt a little burning sensation start I rubbed my nose more and the burning spread. It was inside my nose now! I had put frozen food on the burning area because the burn was so harsh. Eventually that was not helping and the burning was becoming unbearable. Long story short, I remembered hearing that lime would help. All I had was lemon. So I cut one up, squeezed the juice on the area and then twisted the rind and rubbed that all over the burning areas. It worked!! Washing with soap does nothing. Citrus is the key!
 

Chronos

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I used to swear by black olive juice, but, that was years ago.
 

rameez786cool

its simple

wash burned hand with ripen banana..............its really cool
 
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I used to go to this great pho place in the university district, $5 for a big delicious bowl of soup. They have the bean sprouts and the jalepenos on the side. One day I was leaving the restaurant and my eyes were itchy, so I scratched them and almost got in an accident cause I was blinded
 

SecretMarial

I realize the problem will be long solved, but for people like me, searching for advice on a current pepper/jalapeño burn, I wanna add this, dish soap works as a temporary solution, but only for a minute or so. I'm fixing to try some sort of dairy product in a moment. Hands burning, why do we have so many peppers to feed these animals! DX


EDIT: I want to let you people know, you helped me a lot. Baking soda all over my hands and wrist worked super and butter eased the pain under my thumbnail a little. Thanks!
 
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Evo

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Oh, this thread brings back such painful memories.
 

dlgoff

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Oh, this thread brings back such painful memories.
One thing about experiencing how pepper juices get absorbed by the skin; one time is all it takes to not make the mistake again. http://www.stripers247.com/phpBB2/images/smilies/pepper.gif.pagespeed.ce.quCEruV0yq.gif [Broken]
 
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Lisa!

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Oh, this thread brings back such painful memories.
Yeah but it's funny that members update this thread every year!:uhh:
 

Evo

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Curious3141

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If I'd read this thread sooner I'd have suggested yoghurt. Or milk failing that.
 
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A Mexican-American told me that salt helps. I never tried it.

You could also try urinating on it. That works for jellyfish stings.
 
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A Mexican-American told me that salt helps. I never tried it.

You could also try urinating on it. That works for jellyfish stings.
I know of a video of a chimp doing that because he ate something too spicy. Anyone wanna see it?
 

Evo

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I know of a video of a chimp doing that because he ate something too spicy. Anyone wanna see it?
You mean the monkey urinating in his mouth?
 

lisab

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I realize the problem will be long solved, but for people like me, searching for advice on a current pepper/jalapeño burn, I wanna add this, dish soap works as a temporary solution, but only for a minute or so. I'm fixing to try some sort of dairy product in a moment. Hands burning, why do we have so many peppers to feed these animals! DX


EDIT: I want to let you people know, you helped me a lot. Baking soda all over my hands and wrist worked super and butter eased the pain under my thumbnail a little. Thanks!
Ouch - under the nail really hurts. And the more you mess with it, the more it hurts.
 
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Egg will stop the pain and remove jalapeno from skin. crack cold eggs in a bowl apply to affected area. I'm a Hispanic American from New Mexico have used this many times! cuz over here HOT CHILI is served with every meal.
 

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