What Causes Molecules to Aggregate Over a Fiber in Optical Trapping?

In summary: The three modes propagate through the fiber just as they would if the fiber were not there. The fiber does not affect the propagation of the light. The shape and polarization of the three modes is the same in the droplet as in the fiber.
  • #1
Sciencestd
63
9
wvgd.jpg


I poured a droplet that has 1.55 refractive index (RF) over a fiber that has core and cladding with (RI) 1.45 and 1.4 respectively, and I the molecules aggregated over the fiber, known that because the refractive index of the liquid is higher than of than of the core or the cladding a leakage of light from fiber to the droplet happens. The number of propagated modes in the fiber is three modes and the diameter is 13 micrometer.

So I have two questions:
1- So why they aggregate over the fiber? What do you think the scenario is?!
2- Does the shape or the polarization of the three modes still the same in the droplet as in the fiber? Because the shape (or the cross section) of the fiber with respect to the surface is arch...

The image on the left depict the experiment and the image on the right shows the cross section of the fiber.
 
Science news on Phys.org
  • #2
Sciencestd said:
I poured a droplet that has 1.55 refractive index (RF) over a fiber that has core and cladding with (RI) 1.45 and 1.4 respectively, and I the molecules aggregated over the fiber
I am of no technical help yet on your question, but I would like to clarify some of the words in your post and your thread title. Hopefully I can fix up your thread title to attract more attention if the words make more sense to our other users.

So you put a drop of water on top of a thin optical fiber, and saw something happen? What do you mean by this:
and I the molecules aggregated over the fiber
What "molecules"? Water molecules (seems obvious). Light "molecules"? (seems much less obvious). Some other "molecules"?
 
  • Like
Likes Sciencestd
  • #3
It is a solvent which contains MnTPP molecules and the solution is toluene (the "liquid" that was mentioned above)... yes it is thin fiber embedded in a glass so it is in the same plane with the surface of the glass... the molecules (MnTPP) aggregated over the fiber (the thin fiber)... (The fiber is close to the surface..)
 
Last edited:

Related to What Causes Molecules to Aggregate Over a Fiber in Optical Trapping?

1. What is optical trapping over a fiber?

Optical trapping over a fiber is a technique that uses a focused laser beam to trap and manipulate small particles or cells near an optical fiber. The trapping force is generated by the gradient of the light intensity, allowing for precise control and movement of the trapped particles.

2. How does optical trapping over a fiber work?

Optical trapping over a fiber works by using a laser beam to create a gradient of light intensity near the fiber. This gradient creates a force that can trap and manipulate small particles or cells. The trapped particles can then be moved by changing the position or intensity of the laser beam.

3. What are the applications of optical trapping over a fiber?

Optical trapping over a fiber has a wide range of applications in various fields such as biology, physics, and chemistry. It can be used for cell manipulation, single-molecule studies, and optical tweezers. It is also used in the development of new technologies such as optical fiber sensors and microfluidic devices.

4. What are the advantages of optical trapping over a fiber?

One of the main advantages of optical trapping over a fiber is its non-invasive nature, as the particles are trapped without physical contact. It also allows for precise manipulation and control of particles, and can be used for studying biological processes at the cellular level. Additionally, it is a cost-effective and versatile technique that can be easily integrated with other technologies.

5. What are the limitations of optical trapping over a fiber?

One limitation of optical trapping over a fiber is the size of the trapped particles, as they need to be smaller than the wavelength of the laser beam. It also requires a high-powered laser and precise alignment, which can be challenging. Additionally, the trapping force decreases with distance from the fiber, limiting the range of movement for the trapped particles.

Similar threads

Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
1
Views
964
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
1
Views
2K
Back
Top