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"What colour is this dress" craze

  1. I see blue/black

    29.3%
  2. I see white/gold

    46.3%
  3. I see another combination

    19.5%
  4. It changes - sometimes see blue/black, sometimes white/gold.

    4.9%
  1. Feb 27, 2015 #1

    DaveC426913

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    Please don't beat me for bringing some dumb puffed-up internet meme to PF. Seriously, this is embarrassing. But fascinating.

    (I'm posting this in biology because I'm certain it is a colour perception issue.)

    Maybe you have seen this by now.
    http://digg.com/2015/what-color-is-this-dress

    I didn't think anything of it and was about to skip past it. But I showed my wife, and I was gobsmacked to find that she and I had exactly opposite views and had very strong feelings about it.

    I would not have believed there was anything interesting to this if I hadn't had the very thing happen in my own living room.


    Great. Now I'm having the same argument at work.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2015
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 27, 2015 #2

    Suraj M

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    Maybe the website people are changing it now and then!
     
  4. Feb 27, 2015 #3

    DaveC426913

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    BTW, here is the rational explanation:
    http://www.wired.com/2015/02/science-one-agrees-color-dress/

     
  5. Feb 27, 2015 #4

    DaveC426913

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    Nope. I am shoulder-to-shoulder with other people looking at the same screen, and they are crying 'blue/black ya moron!'
     
  6. Feb 27, 2015 #5
    I would say gold/light purple... definitely closer to gold/white than blue/black for me. I'm not really sure how people could see black in it.
     
  7. Feb 27, 2015 #6

    Suraj M

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    Reduse the brightness of you're screen, you should be able to see a tinge of blue/violet/purple in the place of white.
     
  8. Feb 27, 2015 #7

    Bystander

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    Color wheel illusion, Benham's wheel. Here's a U-tube link ---- don't work for me on my laptop --- might work for some people --- better results are obtained watching the real thing.
     
  9. Feb 27, 2015 #8

    phinds

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    I see powder blue and dull brown
     
  10. Feb 27, 2015 #9
    The newest internet social craze is over this photo of a dress. Some people see it blue and black while others see it white and black. What do you think?

    http://www.wired.com/2015/02/science-one-agrees-color-dress/

    https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpf1/v/t1.0-9/p480x480/10931018_1614364172141308_3421383782875954059_n.jpg?oh=63037783e24b9dac81944a71b0ced9e0&oe=557A9255&__gda__=1431167230_1d26b3dbf06088df96d4b028664ace2d

    dressQualia.0.jpg
     
  11. Feb 27, 2015 #10
    I would say one or the other depending on what you mean by the question.

    It seems most lenses have some coating that accentuates the blueness of skies. That same device can often give a blue cast to things that are white. That's my assessment of what's happening here: a white dress is being given a bluish cast by a lens effect. Strictly speaking, though, the pixels are blue.
     
  12. Feb 27, 2015 #11
    A light blue with a hint of golden brown for the whole dress.

    BUT

    When I move the image to only the bottom part, a slightly darker blue and more, but not total balck.
     
  13. Feb 27, 2015 #12

    Evo

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    That's what I see at the top, but the lace at the bottom looks black. The link to the "original" dress comes in white/blacvk or dark blue/black. I can clearly see the two different colors on the original website, but the other photo looks a pale blue/brown. It seems the picture is of poor image/lighting/quality, so since different people see varying hues, I can see where they could perceive the color wrong. I know many people that say purple when I say blue.
     
  14. Feb 27, 2015 #13

    Evo

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  15. Feb 27, 2015 #14

    DrClaude

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    I don't understand why one would want to put a filter on the lens. I think it's a question of white balance: incandescent lighting has a yellowish tint, and depending on the settings, the camera will compensate by giving everything a blue tint. I sometimes get the problem with snow, and have to manually set the camera to the correct white balance.
     
  16. Feb 27, 2015 #15

    Quantum Defect

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    They had this at the coffee shop this morning. All of the men in the room at the time (N=4) saw gold/white and all of the women (N=2) saw black/blue. They had tip jars for voting (smart barristas!) and the vote was pretty evenly split.
     
  17. Feb 27, 2015 #16

    DaveC426913

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    +1 for Claude.
    To this photographer, the dress is quite obviously lit by overcast daylight, which is very blue - especially in the eye of a camera.
     
  18. Feb 27, 2015 #17
    I don't know the backstory, but Minolta lenses, for example, have a reputation for producing "Minolta colors." I have read this being attributed to a special coating.

    Extrapolating from that, rightly or wrongly, I have noticed that just about all digital cameras accentuate the blueness of skies, and I suspect this is deliberately built into the lens (perhaps by means of a coating), simply because consumers like it. It seems to be part of the default "auto" setting. You may be right that it's actually achieved by them setting the white balance a certain way. In any event, white things often seem automatically shifted toward blue, and people are noticing that, such that a certain kind of blue will tell them the original object would be classified as white in real life.

    I want to attach an image here. How can I attach an image directly from my computer with this new system?
     
  19. Feb 27, 2015 #18

    russ_watters

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    I see a badly framed and white balanced photograph.

    I really don't get why this went viral -- do people go to the movies and argue over what color the screen is?
     
  20. Feb 27, 2015 #19
    Mixing up blue with purple is a far cry from mixing up blue/purple and white! In my image above, white is the color surrounding both sides of the photo. Clearly the dress is not a white. I am flabbergasted that anyone could think that dress is white in the photo. As for the black, it can conceivably be considered brown. I don't have problem with that. But how can you mix up blue and white!?
     
  21. Feb 27, 2015 #20
    To some extent it may depend on peoples screen/monitor settings. I see blue/black, but can change to white/gold by altering the colour temperature of my
    display.
     
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