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What happens if the nuclear bomb is placed and exploded on the Jupiter

  1. Jan 22, 2014 #1

    goodphy

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    Hello. I know that more than 80 percent of the atmosphere of the Jupiter is the hydrogen. Does this fact mean that intense explosion possibly with the nuclear bomb burn all the gas of the Jupiter? There must be huge difference to the explosion on Earth.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 22, 2014 #2

    A.T.

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    There was a similar speculation before the first nuke test on Earth:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manhattan_Project

     
  4. Jan 22, 2014 #3

    DrClaude

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    I think goodphy is talking about hydrogen gas burning up, not a continued nuclear chain reaction.
     
  5. Jan 22, 2014 #4

    goodphy

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    Yes I am. I was not going to the nuclear fusion and I had imagined the some sort of chain reaction as we can see the explosion of the gas pipe started with the such a small ignition like using lighter. What about chemical reaction like this instead of the fusion?
     
  6. Jan 22, 2014 #5

    russ_watters

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    ...in which case, the answer is still no, since there is almost no oxygen on Jupiter, so it can't burn.

    Note, we got to watch what happens if there are nuke sized explosions on Jupiter when comet S-L 9 broke apart and impacted 10 years or so ago.
     
  7. Jan 22, 2014 #6

    goodphy

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    Oh..yes chemically oxygen is required to get what people normally call `burn`. Thanks!!
     
  8. Jan 22, 2014 #7
    The process of burning is the oxidization of a material. This means it combines with oxygen to burn. Since there's very little oxygen on Jupiter, nothing would burn.
     
  9. Jan 22, 2014 #8

    A.T.

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    Don't you think something would have ignited it long ago, if it was ignitable? Meteors, lightning etc.
     
  10. Jan 22, 2014 #9

    SteamKing

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    Comet Shoemaker-Levy struck Jupiter in July 1994, almost twenty years ago.
     
  11. Jan 22, 2014 #10

    russ_watters

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    I'm old.
     
  12. Jan 22, 2014 #11
    I have to agree. Felt like it was in the last decade.
     
  13. Jan 22, 2014 #12

    davenn

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    me to hahaha

    But I still vividly recall looking at the big black blotches in the Jovian atmosphere
    through my own telescope.

    Best birthday present ever!

    Dave
     
  14. Jan 23, 2014 #13

    mheslep

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    The Shoemaker-Levy impact was much, much larger in terms of energy release than any nuke: 6x1012 tons of TNT or, per wiki, 600 times the combined global arsenal of nuclear weapons. The nuclear fission or fusion of even a few tons of suitable matter doesn't really compare with high speed collisions of large celestial bodies.
     
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