What Happens Thermally When High-Pressure Air Bursts into a Dead-Ended Tube?

In summary, the conversation is discussing a situation involving high pressure air being released through a rupture diaphragm into an enclosed tubulation. The dimensions of the system are a 1 liter reservoir at 200 bar, a 30 mm diameter rupture disc, and a 5 mm diameter tubulation. The question is what type of heating or cooling will occur during the event, with possible factors including expansive cooling from the released reservoir volume, compressive heating from high pressurization, and potential shock wave phenomena. The system also includes two 90 degree turns after the rupture disc, which may affect the results. The speaker is looking for a useful investigative approach to analyze the system, but notes that time may be a limiting factor.
  • #1
Hiarum
4
1
I have a question in regards to a specific situation and really don't know which elements are significant.

The example is high pressure AIR (a real gas/ not ideal ;-) of relatively unlimited volume,
released via a rupture diaphragm into an enclosed tubulation. (dead ended)

Relative dimensions are 1 liter reservoir at 200 bar, a 30 mm dia. rupture disc into a 5 mm dia. tubulation, a dead ended tube of 30 mm length that has been open to ambient conditions. (no special considerations except it is a trapped volume between the reservoir at the moment of rupture).

The question is what sort of heating/ cooling will be associated with the event?

I can visualize expansive cooling from the released reservoir volume, also, compressive heating from the arriving high pressurization. There may also be "shock wave" phenomena, true? There are two 90 degree "unoptimized" turns after the rupture disc before the tube termination, so friction and churning must be present. (perhaps putting a limit on "shock wave" effects?)

Which mechanism might dominate?
What would be a useful investigative approach to analyze the entire system? Time would seem to limit the measurement possibilities.
 
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  • #2
I can't visualise the problem from your description .

Please post a clear diagram of the system .
 

Related to What Happens Thermally When High-Pressure Air Bursts into a Dead-Ended Tube?

What is gas compression and heating?

Gas compression and heating is the process of increasing the pressure and temperature of a gas through mechanical means. It is commonly used in industries such as oil and gas, chemical, and manufacturing to transport and store gases more efficiently.

What are the benefits of gas compression and heating?

Gas compression and heating can increase the energy density of the gas, making it easier to transport and store. It also allows for more efficient use of the gas, as higher pressures and temperatures can lead to better combustion and energy production.

What types of gases can be compressed and heated?

Almost any gas can be compressed and heated, but the most commonly used gases in industry include natural gas, propane, and nitrogen. Other gases such as carbon dioxide and hydrogen are also commonly compressed and heated for various applications.

What are the different methods of gas compression and heating?

There are several methods of gas compression and heating, including positive displacement compressors, centrifugal compressors, and thermal compressors. Each method has its own advantages and is used for different types of gases and applications.

What safety precautions should be taken when working with gas compression and heating?

Working with compressed and heated gases can be dangerous, so proper safety precautions must be taken. This includes using proper equipment, following procedures, and ensuring proper ventilation. It is also important to regularly inspect and maintain equipment to prevent accidents.

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