What is a "lumachelic limestone"?

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DrDu

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In the description of a fosil site, I ran into the term "lumachelic limestone". Does anybody know, what this means?
 

Bystander

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Googling, I see the source of your consternation; "lumachelic" means "lumachelic." There is some suggestion that "mechanism of deposition" is involved in the definition, but I guarantee nothing at this stage of my inquiry/investigation of this somewhat circular "argument?" More a "mechanical" than sedimentary/chemical/"Bahamian whiting" type origin.

Paging @davenn
 
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DrDu

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Finally, I found an explanation of this term in a thesis:

NIVEL LUMAQUELICO: se denomina lumaquela a toda roca sedimentaria, normalmente de matriz caliza, que contiene una proporción importante de restos de conchas de moluscos o esqueletos de otros animales fosilizados. El nivel 31 lumaquelico comprende una capa de rocas sedimentarias que guardan en su interior restos de seres vivos descompuestos y fosilizados.
 

JBA

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Here is the tranlation:

LUMAQUELIC LEVEL: Lumaquela is called any sedimentary rock, usually of limestone matrix, which contains a significant proportion of shell remains of mollusks or skeletons of other fossilized animals. The level 31 lumaquelico comprises a layer of sedimentary rocks that keep in their interior remains of decomposed and fossilized living beings.

In other geologic terms it is "fossiliferous" rocks or formations

Sorry, I just couldn't resist adding this
 
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Baluncore

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So how is the term lumachelic derived. What is the Etymology?
It appears to mean “made from broken and crushed fragments of shells”.
Does it look like broken fragments of macaroni?
 

DrDu

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Does it look like broken fragments of macaroni?
I guess that's not so far from reality. "Lumachelli" is a kind of pasta and "Lumaca" means snail in italian.
Strangely enough in zoology "lumacus" is a genus of slugs.
 

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