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What is solidus and liquidus temperature of granite?

  1. Oct 18, 2016 #1
    My understanding is that because a rock is composed of variety of minerals, so it does not have fix melting point, rather there is a range below which whole rock is solid and above which whole rock is liquid. I want to know this liquidus and solidus temperature for granite rock based on pressure (as we can't ignore role of pressure inside earth where granite is formed?
     
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  3. Oct 18, 2016 #2

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  4. Oct 18, 2016 #3
    I looked at number of sites (including wikipedia) before posting this question but could not find a relation for solidus/liquidus temperature of granite as a function of pressure.
     
  5. Oct 18, 2016 #4

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    "Granite" includes a range of "sins," as well; did you have a particular "granite" in mind?
     
  6. Oct 18, 2016 #5
    I am considering 'M-type' granite, as the granite under observation is supposed to have mantle source.
     
  7. Oct 18, 2016 #6

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  8. Oct 18, 2016 #7
    http://www.tulane.edu/~sanelson/eens1110/igneous.htm
    Magma and Igneous Rocks

    Basically, using Bowen's Reaction Series as a template, the solidus for a granite is when the last quartz ( or whatever is left in the melt) has crystallized. The liquidus is reached when the last plagioclase of mafic mineral has melted. The role of pressure on melting is touched on about quarter of the way down in the Tulane article.
     
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