What is the Electric Field at Position D on the Equipotential Surfaces?

In summary, the question is asking for the magnitude and direction of the electric field at position D on the graph of equipotential surfaces. The grid lines on the graph are 2.0 cm apart and the given formula is E=-ΔV/ΔS. The student is unsure how to solve for this problem and is asking for help from their peers. One suggestion is to pick two nearest points on the equipotential lines and work from there to approximate the electric field.
  • #1
7411
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0

Homework Statement


The drawing shows a graph of a set of equipotential surfaces in cross section. The grid lines are 2.0 cm apart. Determine the magnitude and direction of the electric field at position D.
Specify whether the electric field points toward the top or the bottom of the drawing.
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Homework Equations


E=-ΔV/ΔS
d=2.0x10-3

The Attempt at a Solution



I am uncertain how to solve for this problem, ΔV is usually between 2 variables, final - initial. Do I repeat this process for each field above point D?
 
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  • #2
Guys, help?
 
  • #3
7411 said:
Guys, help?

You can't say EXACTLY what the E field is. You can only approximate it. I would pick the two nearest points on the equipotential lines and work from there.
 

What are equipotential surfaces?

Equipotential surfaces are imaginary surfaces in a three-dimensional space where every point on the surface has the same electric potential. In other words, the electric potential at any point on an equipotential surface is constant.

Why are equipotential surfaces important?

Equipotential surfaces help us visualize the electric field in a given space. They also allow us to calculate the work done by the electric field on a charged particle moving along the surface. Additionally, equipotential surfaces help us understand how electric potential varies in different regions of space.

How are equipotential surfaces related to electric fields?

Electric fields are always perpendicular to equipotential surfaces. This means that a charged particle moving along an equipotential surface will not experience any change in its kinetic energy, as the electric field does no work on it. The direction of the electric field can also be determined by the direction in which the equipotential surfaces are closer together.

Can equipotential surfaces intersect?

No, equipotential surfaces cannot intersect. If they did, it would mean that two points on the surface would have the same electric potential even though they are at different distances from the source of the electric field. This is not possible as electric potential decreases as distance from the source increases.

How are equipotential surfaces affected by the presence of conductors?

Equipotential surfaces are not affected by the presence of conductors. In a static situation, the electric field inside a conductor is zero, and therefore, the entire surface of a conductor is an equipotential surface. However, the shape and distribution of equipotential surfaces around the conductor may be affected by the presence of other charges in the vicinity.

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