What is the 'first order' diffraction peak?

In summary, the 'first order' diffraction peak refers to the first diffraction peak in the context of diffraction formalism. However, if it is referred to as the 'diffraction peak, to first order', it could mean the value of the first diffraction peak according to a 'first order' approximation. This distinction depends on the specific context. Additionally, the conversation participant also expressed gratitude for the helpful article reference.
  • #1
HotMintea
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Could someone explain what the 'first order' diffraction peak is?
 
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  • #2
It depends on the context. Generally it simply means the first diffraction peak, from the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diffraction_formalism" .

If its the 'diffraction peak, to first order' that can mean something different. That could be the value of the first diffraction peak, according to a 'first order' approximation.
 
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  • #3
zhermes said:
It depends on the context. Generally it simply means the first diffraction peak, from the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diffraction_formalism" .

If its the 'diffraction peak, to first order' that can mean something different. That could be the value of the first diffraction peak, according to a 'first order' approximation.

Thanks for your help!:smile: I also liked the article you referred to.
 
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Related to What is the 'first order' diffraction peak?

1. What is the 'first order' diffraction peak?

The 'first order' diffraction peak refers to the first and strongest peak observed in the diffraction pattern produced by a crystal when it is exposed to a beam of X-rays. This peak represents the most intense diffraction of X-rays by the crystal lattice planes and is used to determine the spacing between these planes.

2. How is the 'first order' diffraction peak calculated?

The 'first order' diffraction peak is calculated using Bragg's law, which states that the angle of diffraction is equal to twice the angle of incidence plus the angle between the crystal lattice planes. This law can be expressed as nλ = 2dsinθ, where n is the order of the diffraction peak, λ is the wavelength of the X-rays, d is the spacing between the crystal lattice planes, and θ is the angle of diffraction.

3. Why is the 'first order' diffraction peak the most intense?

The 'first order' diffraction peak is the most intense because it represents the diffraction of X-rays by the crystal lattice planes with the largest spacing. This means that more X-rays will be diffracted at this angle compared to other angles, resulting in a stronger signal.

4. How does the intensity of the 'first order' diffraction peak change with different crystal structures?

The intensity of the 'first order' diffraction peak can vary depending on the crystal structure of the material being studied. For example, materials with a simple cubic structure will have a stronger 'first order' diffraction peak compared to materials with a more complex structure, such as a body-centered cubic or face-centered cubic structure.

5. What information can be obtained from the 'first order' diffraction peak?

The 'first order' diffraction peak can provide valuable information about the crystal structure of a material, including the spacing between crystal lattice planes and the orientation of the crystal lattice. This information can be used to identify the type of crystal structure and to study the properties of the material, such as its mechanical strength and chemical reactivity.

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