What is the magnitude and direction of the current in conductor RS?

In summary, a conductor RS with 2 m length is placed in a 0.5 T magnetic field and is powered with a current that generates a 1 N force into-the-screen. Using the equation F = BIL sin θ, the magnitude of the current is found to be 1 A. The direction of the current is from S to R, determined by imagining a corkscrew and rotating the velocity vector over the smallest angle to the magnetic field vector. This result is confirmed by using the Lorentz force equation. However, it is important for the individual to fully understand and check their work rather than rely on outside approval.
  • #1
terryds
392
13

Homework Statement



35k4ww3.png


As shown in figure above, a conductor RS with 2 m length which is powered with currents is put in a 0.5 T magnetic field. If the force generated by the conductor is 1 N into-the-screen, then the magnitude and direction of the current in conductor is ...

A. 1 A from R to S
B. 1 A from S to R
C. 2 A from R to S
D. 2 A from S to R
E. 5 A from R to S

Homework Equations



F = BIL sin θ

The Attempt at a Solution



1 = 0.5 I 2 sin 90°
I = 1 Ampere

And, the direction is from S to R
(I point my 4 fingers to the right side, my palm inward, so the thumb (current) points upward)

Is it correct?? I need to make sure about this... I'm self-studying :smile:
Thanks in advance
 
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  • #2
Hi,

PF isn't really good at stamp-approving exercises -- it doesn't really help you if we do and you're found wrong anyway.
(It also antagonizes teachers in general :smile:).
You actually need to convince yourself that what you did is correct (because you fully understand what you did, checked it, etc.).

On the other hand, if I do the exercise I get the same result. I can't remember al these rules, but I can remember the Lorentz force $$\vec F_L = q\left (\vec E+\vec v\times\vec B\right )$$. And if I imagine a corkscrew and rotate ##\vec v## over the smallest angle to ##\vec B## I see that it goes into the page if ##\vec v## points from S to R

--
 
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  • #3
BvU said:
Hi,

PF isn't really good at stamp-approving exercises -- it doesn't really help you if we do and you're found wrong anyway.
(It also antagonizes teachers in general :smile:).
You actually need to convince yourself that what you did is correct (because you fully understand what you did, checked it, etc.).

On the other hand, if I do the exercise I get the same result. I can't remember al these rules, but I can remember the Lorentz force $$\vec F_L = q\left (\vec E+\vec v\times\vec B\right )$$. And if I imagine a corkscrew and rotate ##\vec v## over the smallest angle to ##\vec B## I see that it goes into the page if ##\vec v## points from S to R

--

Alright, thanks..
Sometimes it's just hard to fully confident that it's 100% correct if I'm self-studying..
Thank you for your response anyway :smile:
 
  • #4
I believe you. Hats off & good luck !
 
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1. What is magnetic force?

Magnetic force is the force exerted between two magnetic objects or charged particles due to their magnetic fields. It is a fundamental force of nature that can attract or repel objects depending on their polarity.

2. How is magnetic force calculated?

Magnetic force can be calculated using the formula F = qv x B, where F is the magnetic force, q is the charge of the particle, v is the velocity of the particle, and B is the magnetic field strength. Alternatively, the force can also be calculated using the formula F = BIl, where I is the current, l is the length of the wire, and B is the magnetic field strength.

3. What are some real-life applications of magnetic force?

Magnetic force has many practical applications in our daily lives, including electric motors, generators, magnetic levitation trains, MRI machines, and speakers. It is also used in compasses, credit cards, and computer hard drives.

4. How does distance affect magnetic force?

According to the inverse-square law, the force between two magnets or charged particles decreases as the distance between them increases. This means that the magnetic force is stronger when objects are closer together and weaker when they are farther apart.

5. Can magnetic force be shielded or blocked?

Yes, magnetic force can be shielded or blocked by certain materials, such as ferromagnetic materials like iron, nickel, and cobalt. These materials can redirect the magnetic field, reducing its strength and preventing it from affecting nearby objects.

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