What is the oldest thing you have in your house?

  • Thread starter hbk4894
  • Start date
  • #26
dlgoff
Science Advisor
Gold Member
3,897
1,851
I'd like to see pics of some of the goodies.
 
  • Like
Likes DennisN
  • #27
DennisN
2020 Award
1,621
3,529
I'd like to see pics of some of the goodies.
Me too :smile:. E.g. Roman coins would be nice to see... and old books/equipment. Pictures, please... :woot:
EDIT: Oops, sorry, I just noticed some have posted photos already in the thread, very nice, very nice!
EDIT 2: I like history, but I don't think I have any remarkably old stuff lying around, but I will think about it, and post a picture of the oldest thing I've got. I guess it might be a stamp or some book, we'll see, I have to think about it for a while...
 
Last edited:
  • #28
DennisN
2020 Award
1,621
3,529
Ok, had a look in the archives :biggrin:. The oldest (manufactured) thing I've got is probably this stamp, a four schilling banco blue, from 1855 (and part of the first issued stamp set in Sweden). The picture reveals that it was stamped in 1858 (stamp is upside down):

16877059399_be60f6248d_o.jpg


It's not worth a fortune, less than $100 if I remember correctly. Regretfully it's not the famous Treskilling Yellow :smile: (but it is from the same set of stamps).

I also looked through my books, and the oldest book(s) I've got is coincidentally a set of six history books (Swedish history), printed in 1877. They are in pretty good shape. I bought them (a real bargain) because I liked how they look. Here they are (and the bottommost photo shows they were printed in Stockholm 1877):

17062500301_54be2f6693_o.jpg


As a sidenote I know that the history book set is worth more than the stamp above (but not a fortune).
 
  • Like
Likes davenn, dlgoff, Silicon Waffle and 1 other person
  • #29
e.bar.goum
Science Advisor
Education Advisor
951
390
I'm fairly sure the oldest thing in my house is a rather nice piece of Banded Iron Formation that is about 2.4 billion years old. (It's hard to get a good date, but BIF's were abundant around the time of the great oxygenation event).

(Banded iron formation is just about the coolest rock out there, IMHO).
 
  • Like
Likes dlgoff
  • #30
3
1
I think probably photos from around 1930 I think :)
 
  • #31
DennisN
2020 Award
1,621
3,529
A sidenote to my previous post: While I was looking through my "archives" I found some science memorabilia from the 60s and 70s, I thought I might share another two photos I just took, since some thread readers may be interested in both science and history:
  • First Man On The Moon/Moon Landing, First Day Cover (USA, 1969) - image link
  • A couple of Nobel Prize First Day Covers (Sweden, 60s - 70s) - image link
Just a sidenote though. I hope to see more photos of various old things from more members in this thread...:smile:
 
  • Like
Likes OmCheeto and dlgoff
  • #32
Bandersnatch
Science Advisor
2,955
1,891
20150407_144050.jpg
That is the oldest thing. Not just in my house, it is THE oldest thing. It was given to me just after I was born, and as far as I know the world hadn't existed before.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Likes DrClaude, davenn, lisab and 3 others
  • #33
Doug Huffman
Gold Member
804
111
A fossil commonly found on my Niagara Escarpment property.
 
  • #34
Pythagorean
Gold Member
4,214
272
Probably rocks my daughter brings in. Then... me I guess @ 34 years
 
  • #35
lisab
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
1,887
616
That is the oldest thing. Not just in my house, it is THE oldest thing. It was given to me just after I was born, and as far as I know the world hadn't existed before.
That's adorable!
 
  • #36
694
114
I get a few million year old photons in my house every other night. But they don't stay :(
 
  • #37
528
33
My grandfather.....
I was joking.
I have a cupboard which is more than 150 years old.
 
  • #38
BobG
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
185
81
Probably rocks my daughter brings in. Then... me I guess @ 34 years
Rocks definitely aren't the oldest thing in my house.

I have three rocks that are 13 1/2 years old. I plucked them from a hole on Mt Etna shortly after its eruption. They were still very warm, even though solid.

I have a slide rule that's around 70 years old.

(We were hoping to take the chair lift to the peak. We didn't speak much Italian, but were eventually able to get the idea that the chair lift was closed that day. We exited the opposite side of the building we entered and saw the lift supports laying on the ground, having been toppled by the flowing lava. We were then able to deduce that the lift would probably be closed tomorrow, as well.)
 
  • #39
CWatters
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Gold Member
10,529
2,297
I have a rock from Vesuvius somewhere.

My father was there with the RAF soon after the eruption in 1944. We all climbed up in the late 1960's when I was about 8 years old. I went back to the area with my kids in 2003. I believe it's overdue for another eruption.
 
  • #40
6,265
1,280
ahhh found them :)

View attachment 81538
Not to hijack the thread, but, hijacking the thread here, what does an "Ancient Roman Starter Pack" cost, and, that price being the case, are Roman coins worth more, less, or about the same as they were when originally minted?
 
  • #41
davenn
Science Advisor
Gold Member
9,405
8,287
gosh ... .from memory that pack of 11 coins cost me somewhere around AU$10 - 20 .... it wasn't a huge price to pay for some really old coins :)


Dave
 
  • #42
Lisa!
Gold Member
612
96
Dust on my desk:oldfrown:

I have a 3 cent Victoria coin from 1889, but I can't find any information about it.
I can help you but I need to keep them for a while!:angel:
 
  • #43
6,265
1,280
gosh ... .from memory that pack of 11 coins cost me somewhere around AU$10 - 20 .... it wasn't a huge price to pay for some really old coins :)


Dave
So, I wonder what the modern buying power is compared to the ancient. When I saw that "Starter Pack," it occurred to me that there must be so many Roman coins still in existence that they are not particularly valuable at all. Given the 11 coins, the bulk of what you paid was undoubtedly for the silver one. But what you're really paying for is for someone to grade them, package them up, label them, advertise them, and ship them.
 
  • #44
DennisN
2020 Award
1,621
3,529
gosh ... .from memory that pack of 11 coins cost me somewhere around AU$10 - 20 .... it wasn't a huge price to pay for some really old coins :)
Dave
Thanks to this post, I'm seriously thinking of getting such a pack, I really like such kind of things (by the way, I just googled for "Roman coins starter pack", and this thread came up as #4 on the list :biggrin:).
 
  • Like
Likes dlgoff
  • #45
116
25
The oldest things in my house are this coin from 1943 and this watch whose date is unknown to me, but it surely is older than anything else around here (if anyone knows how to date a pocket watch let me know :D).

11164195_10204265654830126_836305029_n.jpg
11103597_10204265652790075_659086854_n.jpg
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Likes dlgoff and DennisN
  • #46
263
40
mvkWLazwEfDcSWW3dKqcqKQ.jpg

I keep it at my mothers house, got it when I was 2.
 
  • Like
Likes DennisN
  • #47
34,533
6,229
I have a can of garbanzo beans in my pantry that expired in 1963 (have no idea when it was bought).

Funny thing is I've always wondered why I always seem to have a can of garbanzo beans in every house I've lived in when I don't even know what they're used for. All this time, it must have been the same can.
Garbanzo is just Spanish for chickpeas. They can be used in soups, stews, or salads. You can also make hummus from them.
BobG's garbanzo beans are so old, it would probably be better to make humus out of them.
 
  • #48
34,533
6,229
ahhh found them :)
View attachment 81538
According to the description in the paper for davenn's Roman coins, one of them is a silver denarius. Of interest, at least to me, is that if you buy nails at the hardware store, they will have sizes like 12 penny and 16 penny, but written as 12d and 16d. The 'd' in the size has its roots in the Roman coin, denarius. In England before about 1488, the penny size was the price, in pennies, of 100 nails of that size (http://sizes.com/units/penny.htm). Oddly enough, the "100" here was actually a so-called "long hundred" which was actually 120, at least according to this site: http://sizes.com/units/hundred.htm.

When I was in Yugoslavia in 1974, the basic unit of currency was the dinar. You can guess where that word came from. It's still the currency in Serbia and Macedonia (denar), but the other former provinces have different currencies, now.
 
  • Like
Likes zoobyshoe and davenn
  • #49
davenn
Science Advisor
Gold Member
9,405
8,287
According to the description in the paper for davenn's Roman coins, one of them is a silver denarius. Of interest, at least to me, is that if you buy nails at the hardware store, they will have sizes like 12 penny and 16 penny, but written as 12d and 16d. The 'd' in the size has its roots in the Roman coin, denarius.
Cool :smile:
love hearing about these oddball things .... thanks Mark


Dave
 

Related Threads on What is the oldest thing you have in your house?

  • Last Post
Replies
23
Views
3K
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
16
Views
3K
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
55
Views
6K
Replies
74
Views
10K
Replies
46
Views
11K
  • Last Post
3
Replies
71
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
9
Views
3K
Replies
5
Views
9K
Top