What is the use of sodium bicarbonate and electrolyzed water?

In summary, this product advertises itself as a safer version of a hard surface cleaner with bleach, but in reality it is just a dilute bleach solution.
  • #1
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I've bought a cleaning agent which advertises that it contains "sodium bicarbonate and electrolyzed water"and is "different" from normal cleaning detergent.

In fact, what is the home use of such chemicals??
 
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  • #2
Snake oil if you ask me. No such thing as "electrolyzed water" (as in: no matter what they did to it, it doesn't differ from normal water).
 
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  • #3
Borek said:
Snake oil if you ask me. No such thing as "electrolyzed water" (as in: no matter what they did to it, it doesn't differ from normal water).

Snake oil? But it was bought in Daiso, a quite well-reputed company
 
  • #4
Borek said:
No such thing as "electrolyzed water"
Well, I'm also surprised that there is
Yet, I think it is still mostly snake oil, especially in this context and if stored for some time.

kenny1999 said:
I've bought a cleaning agent which advertises that it contains "sodium bicarbonate and electrolyzed water"and is "different" from normal cleaning detergent.
It really is: apparently it is effective in case you have to deal with uranium contamination o0)

During the Manhattan Project to develop the nuclear bomb in the early 1940s, the chemical toxicity of uranium was an issue. Uranium oxides were found to stick very well to cotton cloth, and did not wash out with soap or laundry detergent. However, the uranium would wash out with a 2% solution of sodium bicarbonate.
 
  • #5
Well, sodium bicarbonate is a cleaning agent which is able to clean stains, and can be used as DIY Drainex with sodium chloride and acetic acid(vinegar)
 
  • #6
Rive said:
Well, I'm also surprised that there is

Surprise.

Still, mostly a marketing gimmick, fancy name for a weak bleach. Especially if they add bicarbonate and increase pH.
 
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  • #7
The information at the end of Rive's link makes it sound unlikely that this is what this product is.
My first guess was that it was the advertising name for deionised water, i.e. 'softened', i.e. water from which anions, in particular Ca2+ ions which diminish the cleaning activity of (an)ionic detergents have been removed
according to the so-called "technical sheet" https://people.filasolutions.com/po...-data-sheets/Uk - english/filacleaner-ing.pdf
There is some anionic detergent in the product but it is mainly a non-ionic detergent that has a polar but non-ionising end, an epoxide.

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  • #8
I doubt it has an active epoxide as part of the detergent’s structure. Perhaps the ring-opened structure ... an alcohol. Or better yet, polyethylene oxide or polypropylene oxide or both. A short chain polyether with an OH terminus. Very common these days for use in biodegradable surfactants.
 
  • #9
From the Wiki
yielding a solution of Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH).
If common tablel salt is added to water, ...
Not sure I get the Wiki article discussion.
 
  • #10
Electrolyzed water is just a dilute solution of hypochlorite or bleach. Bleach itself is made in just this way. Salt water brine is electrolyzed to produce Cl2 and NaOH. Bleach is more reactive the lower the pH, so going from a high (~pH 12-14) NaOH solution to a pH of ~8-9 gives you a more reactive solution of hypochlorite and the NaOH is pretty much neutralized. Bicarb becomes a bicarb/carbonate buffer. I believe it stays at around pH 9.
No idea as to the strength of this solution but hypochlorite at these pHs is fairly unstable and I would expect it to decompose to a fairly dilute titer.

Safer version of hard surface cleaner with bleach?
 
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