What kind of motor do you think i need?

  • Thread starter ABHIdAVIATOR
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In summary, the individual is looking for a suitable motor or mechanism to lift and lower a steel plate within the given constraints. After considering various options, they are considering using a miniature rack and pinion system, but are facing difficulties in finding a suitable motor. Suggestions were made to use a threaded shaft DC motor or a linear drive, but the individual is not able to afford these solutions. They also mentioned having no experience with microcontroller programming for stepper motors.
  • #1
ABHIdAVIATOR
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hi,
I'm doing an experiment, in realisation of which i need to move a steel plate up and down. Please consider the following constraints faced by me:

-The plate would rise to 12mm at most.

-The speed should be such that it rises 12mm in around half a second.

-I want to be able to stop the plate anywhere between 0-12mm.

-Variation of the speed may also be needed.

-The plate will be exposed to high pressurefield above, so will tend to come down.

-I have only 75mm(L)*175mm(W)*25mm(H) space to accommodate the lifting mechanism.

-I can also mount the motor outside the above mentioned cavity, but the motor diameter less than 30mm is preferred.

After considering all the above mentioned constraints, I've thought of getting a miniature rack and pinion system manufactured. But the driving motor is still not finalized and I'm facing a problem in it. Initially i thought of using a geared dc motor but then i won't be able to stop it at the precise positions (4mm say). Servos can definitely be used but the speed control is a problem.
Stepper motor seems a good choice but i haven't got much experience working with them.

So, please help me choose a good motor or a new mechanism.

Thank you in anticipation.

Abhishek.
 
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  • #2
how about using a threaded shaft DC motor(make a small coupling) & a nut as the plate? It sure would give high reduction, space requirement is also isn't much, can be quick. though i don't know how well it would respond to speed requirement.
 
  • #3
Hi Aviator,

Judging from your speed requirements, 12mm in 0.5sec, which translates into quite a steep acceleration profile, i suspect a power-screw setup will be too slow. I would recommend looking at a linear drive instead. It will be more expensive, but you can get really fast dynamic response as well as integrated position feedback. Check out these sites:

- http://www.faulhaber-group.com/serv...929&sprachid=1&htdigurl=/n428412/i428419.html
- http://www.copleycontrols.com/Motion/Products/Motors/sta.html

I used one of the ones from copley, STA1104 i think, for a project recently instead of building a crank/con.rod system hooked up to a motor. Keep in mind you need to buy the drive electronics as well. For their smallest servoTube i paid about 1000chf + 600chf for the control box. (1chf ~ 0.9USD) But compared to making anything custom this was a bargain. The drive comes with software and you can drive it from your PC or using an oscilloscope. You could also easily integrate it's control into a Labview application if it's part of a bigger experiment.

I would suggest to try and refine your speed, acceleration, load and space/mounting requirements and make a request to both of these companies. I do this all the time when I'm looking for a component, usually get tons of good responses!

Finally, you will need a linear coupling to connect the linear drive to your load. Ask in your request for a recommendation on this as well.

Hope this helps and good luck!
 
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  • #4
http://www.flickr.com/photos/33711228@N02/3221465139/sizes/o/

this is a possible solution. I don't find a suitable motor.
i think steppers might work, but circuit is the problem. I don't have any exposure of microcontroller programming.

Well, thanks coreyh. Althought the solution you proposed is good, I'm not in a state to afford the same.:frown:
 
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Related to What kind of motor do you think i need?

1. What factors should I consider when choosing a motor?

When choosing a motor, you should consider factors such as the required torque, speed, power, voltage, and current for your application. You should also consider the physical size and weight of the motor, as well as its efficiency and durability.

2. What type of motor is best for my project?

The type of motor that is best for your project depends on the specific requirements of your project. Some common types of motors include DC motors, AC motors, stepper motors, and servo motors. Each type has its own advantages and disadvantages, so it is important to carefully evaluate your project's needs before choosing a motor.

3. How do I determine the correct size of motor for my project?

The size of motor you need will depend on the required torque and speed for your application. You can use torque and speed calculators or consult with a motor expert to determine the appropriate size for your project.

4. What is the difference between brushed and brushless motors?

Brushed motors use physical brushes to transmit electricity to the rotor, while brushless motors use electronic commutation to switch the current to the appropriate coils. Brushed motors are typically less expensive but have a shorter lifespan, while brushless motors are more efficient and have a longer lifespan.

5. Can I use any motor for my project or are there specific motors for different applications?

While some motors may work for multiple applications, there are often specific motors designed for certain tasks or environments. For example, there are motors specifically designed for use in industrial machinery or in underwater environments. It is important to carefully consider your project's needs and select a motor that is suitable for those requirements.

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