What material is best suited for making Chladni figures?

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  • Thread starter Juliette B
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Juliette B
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Hello! For an assignment I am planning to investigate the natural frequency modes of a circular membrane using the "Chladni technique". Usually, these Chladni plates are made out of metal, allowing them to be firm but still quite flexible. For my assignment I am planning on using a thin layer of plexiglass, however when I have a look around online I cannot find anyone else that have tried this and so I am a bit unsure whether this will work out.

Would using plexiglass be a good idea?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Laura
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Should work, waves travel through all solids. It is an interesting experiment though. You may get a different response based on the material used due to the difference in in the speed of sound in the material. Try both!
 
  • #3
Audyn
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Hello! For an assignment I am planning to investigate the natural frequency modes of a circular membrane using the "Chladni technique". Usually, these Chladni plates are made out of metal, allowing them to be firm but still quite flexible. For my assignment I am planning on using a thin layer of plexiglass, however when I have a look around online I cannot find anyone else that have tried this and so I am a bit unsure whether this will work out.

Would using plexiglass be a good idea?

Did this experiment work?
 
  • #4
Bystander
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One needs to pay attention to dates of posts when replying; this post is five years old.
 
  • #5
Audyn
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One needs to pay attention to dates of posts when replying; this post is five years old.
One needs not assume that the time of the thread was not observed. Time does not stop the inquisitive mind. What if by chance the original author received a notification via email with my question and said person decided to respond back? What if the revival of this thread would be seen by another person with a similar experiment and responded back with an aye or nay? What if 5 years from now someone responds to my question with affirmations regardless of my own lack of experimentation? What if?
 
  • #6
berkeman
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Welcome to PF. :smile:

One needs not assume that the time of the thread was not observed. Time does not stop the inquisitive mind. What if by chance the original author received a notification via email with my question and said person decided to respond back? What if the revival of this thread would be seen by another person with a similar experiment and responded back with an aye or nay? What if 5 years from now someone responds to my question with affirmations regardless of my own lack of experimentation? What if?

I think @Bystander was just looking out for you, to make sure you noticed the post date. In addition, if you click on the OP's avatar, you'll notice that they were only here for that one day in 2016 when they posted their question. Such a poster is very unlikely to respond 5 years later (my e-mail address has changed 4 times in the last 5 years, with no forwarding working anymore).

Useful replies to older posts are often appreciated, when they add value for others who will see the thread at a later time. Google leads all kinds of folks to PF for all kinds of topics and searches.

Enjoy PF. :smile:
 
  • #7
gregatphysics
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Like me. Anyway: Experiment.

Also, JD Murray, in his (excellent) book, Mathematical Biology, uses Chladni plates shaped like animals in an explanation/hypothesis for the formation of things like leopard spots and rings on racoon tails. Experiment.
 
  • #8
sophiecentaur
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you'll notice that they were only here for that one day in 2016 when they posted their question.
The beauty of a good forum like PF is the ageless quality of many threads. The OP posted and went off into the night but, like ripples on a pond, the thoughts propagated around PF and were regenerated. I don't really care if the OP is still interested. Like a cuckoo, the egg was laid and we, the overworked parents, are bringing the nestling to maturity.
On a technical level, I would expect a steel plate to work better than a plastic one because of the losses in plastic. With metal you could see the long lasting patterns when the excitation force is removed and the resonances would be better defined, I expect.
( PS Ever see a plastic cymbal??)
 
  • #9
tinfoilunderwear
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Hello! For an assignment I am planning to investigate the natural frequency modes of a circular membrane using the "Chladni technique". Usually, these Chladni plates are made out of metal, allowing them to be firm but still quite flexible. For my assignment I am planning on using a thin layer of plexiglass, however when I have a look around online I cannot find anyone else that have tried this and so I am a bit unsure whether this will work out.

Would using plexiglass be a good idea?
I like it. I dont know how I got here but i like it. ;)
 

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