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What occupies the spaces between particles in a gas?

  1. Mar 12, 2012 #1
    As you can see from the title, I'm puzzled as to what occupies the spaces in between the particles in a gas.

    Take air for example. In Chemistry, I have learnt that the particles in a gas are far apart. Hence the particles in the air around me are far apart. But if there are no particles in the spaces,it means no matter exists. So is it a vacuum? If so, why don't I experience it on a daily basis?

    Sorry if the question is trivial, but it has been bugging me for some time.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 12, 2012 #2

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    Yes, it is vacuum. You don't "see" it as you much larger than the air molecules.

    Note that the space between atoms, regardless of the state of matter, or even inside atoms, is mostly vacuum as well.
     
  4. Mar 12, 2012 #3
    So in other words the distances are insignificant when compared to our size?
     
  5. Mar 12, 2012 #4

    Borek

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    Staff: Mentor

    You can put it that way.
     
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