What Science-Based Hobbies Can Spark Excitement and Productivity?

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In summary, the conversation revolves around the person's struggle to find a hobby that excites them, with a preference for something related to science. Suggestions are made for activities such as chess, mentoring/tutoring, science club mentoring, and physical activities like swimming, biking, and running. The conversation also delves into learning mathematics and physics, reading and learning about a specific topic, and learning digital media. Playing the guitar is also suggested, with options for playing with headphones to avoid disturbing others. The conversation also touches on the cost of guitar gear and the importance of finding a good hobby.
  • #1
kolleamm
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I'm having trouble finding a hobby that really excites me. I've always been a big fan of science but I never really knew what I should do with it.
So far I've just been programming but I haven't really found much use for it outside of building websites or apps which is a really boring task for me. I need something to really engage my brain and to feel productive about it too.

Any ideas?
 
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  • #2
  • Chess -- there are several levels to learn, with lots of interesting strategies to learn
  • Mentoring/Tutoring -- Do you know any young people that you could help out?
  • Mentoring a Science Club -- Maybe at your local high school?
  • Swim/Bike/Run -- Not science related per se, but very important to make part of your life IMO
:smile:
 
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  • #3
Doing mathematics and physics is fun rewarding.

Anything active is great for you. Hiking, sports, etc. I would whole heartedly recommend you include something active, it benefits you in all aspects of life.

Reading. Find a topic that interests you, devour all the literature on it, take some notes.
 
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  • #4
You could learn digital media and make use of your computer skills in some making some kind of production (like making a video).
Some these programs are extremely complex and various steps can be programmed.
There are few limits to what you can to do once you get your footage and sound into the program.
You can do pretty advanced things that would have required a studio several years ago.

Here is an interesting example of how modern electronics make making movies easier (deals with one of my favorite movies):
Edit: you can hear Teller speak!
 
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  • #5
Guitar is another good one. It takes patience, but its a lot of fun. You could throw in electronics as well and try building and modding your own equipment.
 
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  • #6
Mondayman said:
Guitar is another good one. It takes patience, but its a lot of fun. You could throw in electronics as well and try building and modding your own equipment.
I love this idea, is it possible to play the electric guitar to my earphones so I don't make noise in the house?
 
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  • #7
Yes, you can buy amps and that allow headphones to be plugged in, so you can play at any time of the day.

Guitar gear can get pricey. I would focus on playing acoustic or unplugged at first, before affording all that expensive gear. I know too many people who bought a brand new Les Paul or PRS, only to give up after a month.
 
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  • #8
kolleamm said:
I'm having trouble finding a hobby that really excites me. I've always been a big fan of science but I never really knew what I should do with it.
So far I've just been programming but I haven't really found much use for it outside of building websites or apps which is a really boring task for me. I need something to really engage my brain and to feel productive about it too.

Any ideas?
Spend more time learning and studying.
Find or look for a job, parttime or fulltime or "as needed".

Hobbies really find the person. The person does not look for the hobbies.

You may find, either in some part of your studies or in a job, a motivation to automate some information processing. Since you mentioned some "programming", you may have a specific software program which you may want to both create and use.
 
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  • #9
symbolipoint said:
Hobbies really find the person. The person does not look for the hobbies.
That's a really good point.
 
  • #10
Mondayman said:
Yes, you can buy amps and that allow headphones to be plugged in, so you can play at any time of the day.

Guitar gear can get pricey. I would focus on playing acoustic or unplugged at first, before affording all that expensive gear. I know too many people who bought a brand new Les Paul or PRS, only to give up after a month.

I think it's actually easier to learn on an electric. And with headphones you won't bug anybody around you so you'll be able to play more often. Entry level electric guitars are reasonably decent nowadays. And for $50 you can buy a box (not an amp) that will allow you to modify the sound and that you can plug your headphones into. You can play an electric exactly as if it were an acoustic guitar but with less finger effort. And quietly.

There are endless possibilities for hobbies. There isn't enough time for even a small fraction of them.
 
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  • #11
I meant playing electric unplugged, not acoustic. My bad.

Indeed there are many hobbies out there. Try out the ones that interest you and see what happens. A good hobby is one of the most rewarding things to have.
 
  • #12
kolleamm said:
I love this idea, is it possible to play the electric guitar to my earphones so I don't make noise in the house?
Mondayman said:
Yes, you can buy amps and that allow headphones to be plugged in, so you can play at any time of the day.

Guitar gear can get pricey. I would focus on playing acoustic or unplugged at first, before affording all that expensive gear. I know too many people who bought a brand new Les Paul or PRS, only to give up after a month.

@kolleamm , as @Mondayman said there are amps you can plug earphones into.

Effects, amp simulators etc. :

Also, there are other options with technology nowadays, like guitar multieffects with built in amp simulators.
Here is one I bought recently which I am very satisified with (good value for the money):
Zoom G1X Four Multi Effect-Pedal.
It has got a lot of various guitar effects, amp simulators, cabinet simulators, a tuner, a drum machine and a looper where you can record yourself, and then play along with what you recorded. And you can plug this box into a computer and edit the effects via the computer too. Very nifty.

Furthermore, there are also various wireless connection options, here's one example.

There are also very cheap, very small, basic amp simulators, here's one.

Guitars:

When considering buying a first guitar I would suggest a reasonably cheap, but also reasonably good beginner guitar. If it's not reasonably good (ok fretting, ok tuning stability) it can be a turnoff.

Electric guitars:

Here's a reasonably good Stratocaster style guitar that I have myself. I also have a much more expensive US Strat (70s) which I probably will sell soon. Other cheap but ok Strat guitars are e.g. Squiers.

When it comes to Les Paul style guitars, I have got an Epiphone Les Paul which I am very satified with. Harley Benton also has their own Les Paul variants, I haven't tried any of those.

Yamaha Pacificas are considered by many to be great guitars for beginners. I can't say myself, I don't remember if I have tried playing any of those.

Acoustic guitars:

When it comes to acoustic guitars I would personally actually suggest starting with a nylon-stringed guitar. They can be quite nice to play on, as they have a soft sound and are very easy on your hand and fingers. Steel stringed guitars are often more hard on your hands and fingers.
Nevertheless here's one steel stringed guitar I bought a couple of years ago which is good value for money. It has also got a built in tuner, eq and pickup so it can be directly plugged into a mixer, amp or recording unit.
 
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  • #13
JT Smith said:
You can play an electric exactly as if it were an acoustic guitar but with less finger effort.
@kolleamm , I forgot to say that the Zoom multieffect pedal I mentioned above has an effect that actually can simulate a steel-stringed acoustic guitar. If you use an electric guitar, it will process the sound from the electric guitar and "convert" it (so to say) into the sound of an acoustic steel string guitar. It can do it reasonably good, actually.

The effect pedal has also got an effect which can simulate a sitar, which is personally think is very cool.

Furthermore, there are also pitch shifting effects in the pedal which can be used to simulate e.g. bass (by lowering the pitch one octave) and 16-stringed guitars (by adding a one octave pitch shifted sound to the original sound). But I don't think the pitch shift effects in this pedal are very good, e.g. there is a quite noticeable delay of the sound due to the pitch shift processing.

Despite this, the Zoom pedal is incredibly versatile, and in my opinion very good value for the money.

EDIT:

Here's a sound video demo of the pedal:
(and the acoustic guitar simulation can be heard at 3 m 13 s)
And here's a longer review of the pedal by a very funny German guy :smile::
 
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  • #14
Leatherworking. Making something useful is its own special reward.



 
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  • #15
Boxkicking is a good and active hobby for someone looking to vent a little steam.
 
  • #16
kolleamm said:
I'm having trouble finding a hobby that really excites me. I've always been a big fan of science but I never really knew what I should do with it.…………….

Any ideas?
well, most of my hobby interests are science based/related

Electronics and amateur radio
Geology, in particular seismology ( see my posts in the Earth science section)
tho there are more sub catagories that I am deeply involved in
fossil collecting
rock and mineral collecting
subbed into...
Fluorescent minerals, Radioactive minerals and Meteorites
(For meteorites, see some my posts in the astronomy section on PF)

Astronomy again, see my posts in the astronomy section
subbed into general astronomy and astrophotography

If you couldn't find something amongst all those choices to get you teeth into,
then you have a problem haha :wink: :wink:

cheers
Dave
 

Related to What Science-Based Hobbies Can Spark Excitement and Productivity?

1. What are some interesting hobbies to pursue?

Some interesting hobbies to pursue include photography, painting, hiking, cooking, and playing a musical instrument.

2. How do I find a hobby that suits me?

To find a hobby that suits you, think about your interests and what you enjoy doing. You can also try new activities and see what you like.

3. Are there any inexpensive hobbies?

Yes, there are plenty of inexpensive hobbies such as reading, gardening, crafting, and writing. These hobbies can be done with minimal materials and can even save you money in the long run.

4. Is it beneficial to have a hobby?

Yes, having a hobby can provide numerous benefits such as reducing stress, improving mental health, and increasing creativity. It can also be a great way to meet new people and learn new skills.

5. Can I turn my hobby into a career?

It is possible to turn your hobby into a career, but it requires dedication and hard work. You may need to develop your skills and network with others in the industry. It is important to also have a backup plan in case it does not work out.

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