What's the derivation of the 'Kinetic Equation' in Chemical kinetics?

In summary, the conversation discusses the topic of chemical kinetics. It is mentioned that the reaction speed for a general chemical equation can be expressed as v = k[A]m[B]m. The formula is derived from the fact that for first order reactions, the rate is proportional to the concentration of the species involved, and for second order reactions, it depends on the frequency of encounters between two species. It is also mentioned that the formula was likely first proposed and then experimentally proven.
  • #1
Ale_Rodo
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Hi,

I'm following an introduction course to chemistry and I am reviewing the chapter on Chemical kinetics.
It's shown that the reaction speed for a certain component of a general chemical equation such as aA +bB <-> cC + dD , might be expressed as v = k[A]m[ B]m.

I was wondering where it does come from. It's just plain curiosity, I don't really need to know this for the upcoming exam but I would really appreciate if someone could give a rigorous derivation or a 'sense-full' logic interpretation of said formula.

Thank you in advance.
 
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  • #2
It goes something like this: For a first order reaction involving a single molecular species, the reaction rate has to be proportional to the amount of the species, as represented by its concentration. For a 2nd order reaction, involving interaction of two molecular species, the rate of the reaction depends on the frequency of encounters between the two species, which is proportional to the product of their concentrations.
 
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  • #3
Was the formula first supposed like that and the experimentally proved?
 
  • #4
Ale_Rodo said:
Was the formula first supposed like that and the experimentally proved?
If I understand your question correctly, then, pretty much yes.
 
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  • #5
Chestermiller said:
If I understand your question correctly, then, pretty much yes.
Fair enough this time, thanks!
 

1. What is the 'Kinetic Equation' in Chemical Kinetics?

The Kinetic Equation in Chemical Kinetics is a mathematical representation of the rate at which a chemical reaction occurs. It relates the rate of a reaction to the concentration of reactants and the temperature of the reaction.

2. Who developed the Kinetic Equation?

The Kinetic Equation was first developed by Swedish chemist Svante Arrhenius in the late 19th century. However, it has been modified and expanded upon by many other scientists since then.

3. What is the significance of the Kinetic Equation in Chemical Kinetics?

The Kinetic Equation is significant because it allows scientists to predict and understand the behavior of chemical reactions. It also helps in the design and optimization of industrial processes involving chemical reactions.

4. How is the Kinetic Equation derived?

The Kinetic Equation is derived using principles from the field of thermodynamics, specifically the Arrhenius equation. It takes into account the activation energy of a reaction and the rate constant, which is related to the frequency of collisions between reactant molecules.

5. Can the Kinetic Equation be applied to all chemical reactions?

No, the Kinetic Equation is mainly applicable to reactions that follow the principles of the Arrhenius equation, such as simple reactions between two molecules. It may not accurately predict the rate of more complex reactions involving multiple steps or intermediates.

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