Where to look for a UV light that is invisible to the naked eye?

In summary, the conversation discusses the search for a UV light that is invisible to the naked eye for a science experiment. The individual is aware of the dangers and is taking precautions, but is looking for a source of UV without the blue/violet glow typically seen in commercial black-lights. Safety concerns and budget options are also mentioned in the conversation.
  • #1
David Nolan
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TL;DR Summary
Where to look for a UV light that is invisible to the naked eye?

No blue/violet light, I just want the UV light that is invisible to the naked eye like. A lens that filtered out the blue/violet light from a black-light would also be fine. Looking for leads.

Why I want one?

Science experiment... related reasons.

FYI: I know they are dangerous and am taking precautions.
Where to look for a UV light that is invisible to the naked eye?

Essentially I want to buy a UV light that doesn't have that annoying blue glow, I just want the UV light that is invisible to the naked eye like infrared light. I read a bit about it and from what I read what I'm looking for is possible. A lens that filtered out the blue/violet light would also be fine. Looking for leads.

Why I want one?

Science... related reasons.

FYI: I know they are dangerous and am taking precautions.
 
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  • #2
David Nolan said:
FYI: I know they are dangerous and am taking precautions.
This is not a private chat. It is a public forum. Thousands of people can read the content, now or years into the future. Even children can find this thread by search and read the content. Do you really want us to give advice that may be dangerous to someone on a public forum?
 
  • #3
I'm getting a tan just reading this thread! :smile:
 
  • #4
David Nolan said:
Science experiment... related reasons.
BTW, Welcome to PF, David. As you can tell by now, we take safety pretty seriously here at PF. Since you mentioned safety explicitly, this sounds like you want a pretty intense source of UV. What exactly is your "science experiment"? Why do you need an intense UV source to conduct it? Can you not do the same science experiment at the power level of fractions of a watt?
 
  • #5
Hi Berkeman, thanks for getting back to me. Honestly the only reason I put that in there was because people kept telling me it wasn't safe to use UV light period (Stack Exchange) . I don't want a powerful UV light at all. I just want one without the blue/violet glow you see in commercial black-lights. The experiment is 'classified' :wink::-p
 
  • #6
anorlunda said:
This is not a private chat. It is a public forum. Thousands of people can read the content, now or years into the future. Even children can find this thread by search and read the content. Do you really want us to give advice that may be dangerous to someone on a public forum?

For the record, yes. I think the benefits outweigh the risks.
 
  • #7
berkeman said:
BTW, Welcome to PF, David. As you can tell by now, we take safety pretty seriously here at PF. Since you mentioned safety explicitly, this sounds like you want a pretty intense source of UV. What exactly is your "science experiment"? Why do you need an intense UV source to conduct it? Can you not do the same science experiment at the power level of fractions of a watt?

I responded in a new post accidentally. Apologies.
 
  • #10
In our lab we have used these UV LEDs from Thor and the Edmund Optics filters for calibration of UV sensors in hydrogen flames. This is probably what you want in an accurate academic experiment. You can also find cheaper LEDs online that cost a couple of [insert coin here], but I do not know what to expect from them.
You can also find circular UV-pass filters online for making UV pictures with a regular camera, they are dirt cheap.
 
  • #11
David Nolan said:
I just want one without the blue/violet glow you see in commercial black-lights. The experiment is 'classified'
So you want a UV source that people will not know is there, and the experiment is secret. Okay. Are the subjects of this experiment aware of what you are doing, and have said it is okay? Or are you going to expose people to this UV without their consent?
 
  • #12
Have you considered that the annoying blue glow is part of the safety precautions of the UV light? It alerts people that something active is there. It is like adding tear gas to odorless natural gas to alert people if there is a leak.

You plan to take precautions, but you ask about removing a precaution.
 
  • #14
David Nolan said:
Hi Berkeman, thanks for getting back to me. Honestly the only reason I put that in there was because people kept telling me it wasn't safe to use UV light period (Stack Exchange) . I don't want a powerful UV light at all. I just want one without the blue/violet glow you see in commercial black-lights. The experiment is 'classified' :wink::-p
berkeman said:
So you want a UV source that people will not know is there, and the experiment is secret. Okay. Are the subjects of this experiment aware of what you are doing, and have said it is okay? Or are you going to expose people to this UV without their consent?
Well, since you have not responded, this thread is closed as potentially dangerous. If you want to contact me via PM to explain your project better, there is a chance that this thread can be reopened.
 
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Related to Where to look for a UV light that is invisible to the naked eye?

1. Where can I find a UV light that is invisible to the naked eye?

UV lights that are invisible to the naked eye can be found in various places, such as scientific supply stores, online retailers, and some hardware stores. They are also commonly used in medical and industrial settings.

2. What type of UV light should I look for?

There are three types of UV light: UVA, UVB, and UVC. UVA and UVB lights are commonly used for commercial and personal purposes, while UVC lights are primarily used for sterilization and disinfection. Depending on your specific needs, you should choose the appropriate type of UV light.

3. Can I use a regular flashlight to see UV light?

No, regular flashlights do not emit UV light. They emit visible light, which is a different type of electromagnetic radiation. You will need a specialized UV light source to see UV light.

4. How can I protect my eyes from UV light?

UV light can be harmful to the eyes, so it is important to take precautions when working with it. You can protect your eyes by wearing UV-blocking safety glasses or goggles. These can be found at most hardware stores or online retailers.

5. Are there any safety precautions I should take when using UV light?

Yes, there are several safety precautions you should take when using UV light. First, always wear protective eyewear to prevent damage to your eyes. Additionally, avoid direct exposure to UV light for extended periods of time. It is also important to follow the manufacturer's instructions and handle the UV light with care to prevent any accidents or injuries.

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