Which is Correct? a/(a-b) and b/(a-b)

  • Thread starter Charmin_Ultra
  • Start date
In summary: This will give you a clue as to which one is bigger. In the case of a<b, the first expression is smaller, so "c" is the answer. In the case of a>b, the first expression is bigger, so "b" is the answer.
  • #1
Charmin_Ultra
3
0
Sorry if this is not in the right section.

Give what you think is the right answer and please explain why, too.

a =/= b

Two expressions are

1. a/(a-b)
2. b/(a-b)

Are these two expressions:

a) Equal
b) Not equal
c) Expression 1 is bigger than expression 2
d) Expression 2 is bigger than expression 1

Remember that variable "a" is not equal to variable "b".
 
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  • #2
I think b is the answer
 
  • #3
Charmin_Ultra said:
Sorry if this is not in the right section.

Give what you think is the right answer and please explain why, too.

a =/= b

Two expressions are

1. a/(a-b)
2. b/(a-b)

Are these two expressions:

a) Equal
b) Not equal
c) Expression 1 is bigger than expression 2
d) Expression 2 is bigger than expression 1

Remember that variable "a" is not equal to variable "b".

Charmin_Ultra said:
I think b is the answer

Welcome to the PF.

I have moved your thread to the schoolwork forums. Can you say more about why you think "b" is the answer? We require that you show your work here, before we can offer any tutorial assistance.
 
  • #4
Actually now that I think about it I believe that c is the answer because no matter what the first expression will always be greater than the second expression. So, since it will always be greater, then b must also be correct.

The reason why I think it is c is because if you substituted numbers for each variable, the first expression would always yield a greater answer.

Also this is not schoolwork. I just came across this problem somewhere which is why I did not really know which category it should go into.
 
  • #5
Charmin_Ultra said:
Actually now that I think about it I believe that c is the answer because no matter what the first expression will always be greater than the second expression. So, since it will always be greater, then b must also be correct.

The reason why I think it is c is because if you substituted numbers for each variable, the first expression would always yield a greater answer.

Also this is not schoolwork. I just came across this problem somewhere which is why I did not really know which category it should go into.

Anything that looks like schoolwork is posted here in the HH forums, and the HH rules apply (showing your work, for example).

I agree that both "b" and "c" appear to be valid answers. "c" is a stronger answer than "b", so if you were forced to pick one over the other, pick the stronger (more stringent and constraining) answer.

One way to do it a bit more mathematically is work out the relationship for each of the two possible cases: a<b and a>b.
 
  • #6
Subtract one expression from the other.
 

Related to Which is Correct? a/(a-b) and b/(a-b)

1. What does "a/(a-b)" and "b/(a-b)" mean?

"a/(a-b)" and "b/(a-b)" are mathematical expressions involving two variables, a and b, and the operation of division. In these expressions, the denominator (a-b) represents the difference between a and b, while the numerator (a or b) represents the value being divided by the difference.

2. Can "a/(a-b)" and "b/(a-b)" be simplified?

Yes, these expressions can be simplified by factoring out the common factor of (a-b) from both the numerator and denominator. This will result in the simplified expressions of "a" and "b" respectively.

3. Are "a/(a-b)" and "b/(a-b)" equivalent?

Yes, these expressions are equivalent, meaning they have the same value for any given values of a and b. This can be shown by simplifying both expressions to the same form of "a" or "b", which will have the same value for any given values of a and b.

4. When can "a/(a-b)" and "b/(a-b)" be undefined?

These expressions will be undefined when the value of (a-b) is equal to 0. This is because division by 0 is undefined in mathematics.

5. In what situations would "a/(a-b)" and "b/(a-b)" be used?

These expressions are commonly used in algebra and calculus to represent ratios or fractions involving two variables, a and b. They can also be used to solve equations or simplify more complex expressions.

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