Which is the best Mathematical Physics book

  • Thread starter fortitude
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  • #1
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Prefer me a book that covers entire Mathematics which is required for Physics

Note:
please consider me a new(3 years no touch of maths due to health issue) and the book you prefer me must have clear understanding of mathematical concepts

subjects as follows

#Algebra
#Trigonometry
#Calculus
#Differential equation

#Complex variables
# simultaneous linear equation and determinants
# vector analysis

and other Mathematical physics subjects which i missed here

Regards
Fortitude
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
George Jones
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Prefer me a book that covers entire Mathematics which is required for Physics
There is no single book that covers all the mathematics used in physics.
subjects as follows

#Algebra
#Trigonometry
#Calculus
#Differential equation

#Complex variables
# simultaneous linear equation and determinants
# vector analysis

and other Mathematical physics subjects which i missed here

Regards
Fortitude
Maybe Basic Training in Mathematics: A Fitness Program for Science Students by R. Shankar,

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0306450356/?tag=pfamazon01-20&tag=pfamazon01-20.

Use the LOOK INSIDE! feature to see the table of contents.
 
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  • #3
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I think your approach is all wrong. If you need to study algebra and trig, then you have no business looking for a book about vector calculus. And as the other fellow said, there is no single book that has everything anyway.

If you COULD find such a book, it would either be 10,000 pages, or it would treat each subject so briefly that you would not be able to learn much from it. Any such text might be useful for review of people who have already taken the classes, but not for people learning the subjects.

Get a good precalculus text --- just look on here or Amazon, and read through the reviews, and find one that people like, and is available used for cheap. Read it and learn it, and THEN look for a calculus text. Read THAT, or at least most of it, and then look for linear algebra and DE. And so on.

And, as always, "read" is shorthand for "study and do a good selection of the problems."
 
  • #4
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I should add that if your reason for wanting just one book is to save money, there is no need for that. You can find used (i.e. previously owned) older editions of excellent texts for very low prices on Ebay and Amazon. And you can find free lecture notes and even complete texts on every subject on the internet.
 
  • #5
epenguin
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For what it is worth when often I cannot be troubled to work out a bit of theory myself from scratch, as well as some stuff just beyond my knowledge I often still look stuff up in 'Ancillary Mathematics' by Massey and Kestleman, a physicist and a mathematician. I did not use it at university myself but got it afterwards for looking up as an occasional user of maths. Continue to use it also because I easily find my way around in it. Went through several editions. The title gives away that it was tailored to a (London) University syllabus, particularly to people like chemists and engineers not specialising in phys/math. The 'syllabus reform' of the time was that they ought to have some, or more.

I'd say its approach is traditional and practical for people needing to solve and understand maths arising in sciences. Although it could help you solve problems you might not be able to explain and justify solutions in jawbreaking modern terminology
cahesouslachaise.gif
or recognise easily when anyone else does. Covering material I guess of first two University years except for specialists, starting some things from start but you won't find elementary school things like trig e.g. sin(A+B) or trad Euclidean geometry.

So maybe not for everybody but it is solid knowledge for sale at the ridiculous price of £0.01-0.02 /page of which there are nearly 1,000.

Here couple of reviews:

http://journals.cambridge.org/downl...89a.pdf&code=b6a8c52b790b67dc799cf8f415584175



*
Seller: esaxophone

Little bit worn. This is a great book - I was in Kestleman's class in 1963 at UCL - he was dedicated in his work to helping students really understand and enjoy maths, he wrote to help, not for his own gratification. I also had physics lessons with Massey - a great thinker - with immense clarity of expression - his notes, taken verbatum, read as if they were from a printed book. What better authors could you possibly have?
 
  • #6
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thank you everyone who preferred me ....

few here points out about my negative(money saving) approach ....

since Sep 2011 i planned to do MRes in Physics i desperate to learn Mathematical physics

i reckon few here misunderstood me

books i found out while surfing

1.Mathematical Techniques -D.W.Jordon and P.Smith
2.What is Mathematics-Richard Courant and Herbert Robbins revised by Ian Stewart
3.Mathematical methods of Physics-Mathews ,Walker
 
  • #7
27
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Wolfson and Wolfson mathematics for physicists is a great "has basically everything" book.

After that I would simply get to know the maths section of the library
 
  • #8
37
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Mathematical methods in the physical sciences by Mary L. Boas is a good all rounder which I often dip into to remind myself of some concepts.
 
  • #9
12
0
thank you everyone who preferred me ....

few here points out about my negative(money saving) approach ....

since Sep 2011 i planned to do MRes in Physics i desperate to learn Mathematical physics

i reckon few here misunderstood me

books i found out while surfing

1.Mathematical Techniques -D.W.Jordon and P.Smith
2.What is Mathematics-Richard Courant and Herbert Robbins revised by Ian Stewart
3.Mathematical methods of Physics-Mathews ,Walker
tot this one too
4.Mathematical methods for Physics and Engineering by K.F.Riley,M.P.Hobson,S.J.Bence
 
  • #10
My favorite ones (which I think are useful):

1. "Advanced Engineering Mathematics by Erwin Kreyszig" is a very good book that covers many important topics overall.

2. "Partial Differential Equations for Scientists and Engineers by S. J. Farlow" treats PDE's specifically.

3. "Mathematical Methods for Physicists by G. B. Arfken and H. J. Weber".

4. "Differential Equations with Applications and Historical Notes by G. F. Simmons".

5. "Group Theory in Physics by Wu-Ki Tung".

6. "Classical Groups for Physicists by B. G. Wybourne".
 

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