Why do we say basolateral membrane and not basal?

In summary, the term "basolateral membrane" is used in textbooks to refer to a specific part of the cell membrane that plays a role in transferring substances. This term is used because it describes both the bottom and side of the cell where the membrane is located. The distinction between the apical and basal sides of epithelial cells also contributes to the use of this term.
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red65
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Hello everyone, I am studying the physiology of the kidneys and in all of the textbooks they say basolateral membrane referring to the basal membrane, does anyone know why we don't just say basal membrane?
 
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Depending on the structure of the membrane you are talking about, basolateral might be referring to parts of the cell with the same function (transferring stuff across a membrane, which is what the kidney does a lot of). If that were the case the lateral membranes would provide an increase in surface area through which transfers could occur. If so, this would be a functional issue influencing the name used.

In general, there is a cytological distinction in many animal cells between the apical and basal sides of the cell. All epithelial cells have this distinction.
 
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