Why Do We Use Sh*t Instead of Just Typing ****? :smile:

  • Thread starter rootX
  • Start date
In summary, the conversation revolves around the use of profanity and the effectiveness of censoring certain words. The speakers discuss their experiences with censorship and share their opinions on whether or not it is necessary. They also mention the confusion that can arise when certain words are censored and the potential problems it can cause in communication. The conversation ends with a suggestion for an educational thread about the history of curse words.
  • #1
479
4
instead of simply typing ****! :smile:
 
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  • #2
oo, I got the answer!
but still, doesn't make much sense
 
  • #3
because they're are so many other four letter words that **** could be
 
  • #4
oo, initially I didn't type ****; filter did that.

But I wonder why there's even such filter when people use sh*t anyways and it is considered acceptable.
 
  • #5
It's not always considered acceptable. It's both profane and vague, so it could cause communication problems in at least a couple of ways.
 
  • #6
It's so that people know which bad word you aren't using. ;-p
 
  • #7
It does make it a wee bit bothersome anytime you need to mention a textbook authored by Lifsh!tz!
 
  • #8
Why we use [deleted for content] ...
Because, for some strange reason, you think that if the software censor is not actually invoked, then you're not breaking the forum's language rules. Or, maybe, because you are intentionally violating those rules, and wish to thwart the software censor's attempts to obscure it.
 
Last edited:
  • #9
Math Is Hard said:
It's not always considered acceptable. It's both profane and vague, so it could cause communication problems in at least a couple of ways.

Yes, for example, one might confuse sh*t with shat, thus making the tense unclear.
 
  • #10
Be@ts me. I don't run up against this problem.
 
  • #11
why not just shit?
or
Shit

Anyway I am far too young to be using thwese words or even understand them. I'm off to wash my mouth out now
 
  • #12
I use the exclamation mark. I foresee a thread lock in the future, and possibly a banning, but that's just the psychic in me...
 
  • #13
Ivan Seeking said:
Yes, for example, one might confuse sh*t with shat, thus making the tense unclear.

I have done that on several occasions...(So many awkward times I walked into a bathroom in use because of bad censorship.:yuck:)
 
  • #14
SHIP
HIGH
IN
TRANSIT

Knowing the history of a word makes it a lot less vulgar. It's obscene that such a word is censored.
 
  • #15
Pythagorean said:
SHIP
HIGH
IN
TRANSIT

Knowing the history of a word makes it a lot less vulgar. It's obscene that such a word is censored.


FINALLY i understand
 
  • #16
I think a 'history of curse words' thread would be educational, but it would be kind of confusing talking about **** vs. **** or the advantages of **** over ****.
 

1. Why do we use "sh*t" in our everyday language?

The word "sh*t" is a commonly used slang term that is often used as an expletive or to express frustration or emphasis. It has become a part of our everyday language and is used as a way to convey strong emotions or reactions.

2. Is using "sh*t" considered offensive or inappropriate?

This can depend on the context in which it is used. Some may find it offensive or inappropriate, while others may not have a problem with it. It is important to be aware of your audience and use language appropriately in different situations.

3. What does the book "Why We Use Sh*t: A Guide" aim to explain?

The book aims to explore the origins and meanings behind the use of the word "sh*t" in our language and culture. It delves into the history, psychology, and sociology of using this particular word.

4. How does the use of "sh*t" impact language and communication?

The use of "sh*t" can add emphasis and emotion to language, but it can also be seen as vulgar or offensive in certain contexts. It is important to consider the impact of our words on others and to use language responsibly.

5. Are there any alternatives to using "sh*t" in our language?

There are certainly alternative words or phrases that can be used to express similar emotions or ideas. However, the use of "sh*t" is deeply ingrained in our language and culture, so it may be difficult to completely eliminate it from our vocabulary.

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